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Baker-Berry: Past Exhibits

Student Library Service Bookplate Program

2016 student bookplate exhibit poster

Dartmouth Class of 2016

The Student Library Service Bookplate Program honors the Library’s graduating student employees by inviting them to choose books and other items for the Library’s collections. Each item will receive a bookplate that acknowledges the student’s selection and honors his or her service to the Library.

Students are eligible if they worked at least two terms in any Library department (including RWIT, The Student Center for Research, Writing and Information Technology).

The Library will honor nearly fifty students from the class of 2016 with selections ranging from world fiction, cookbooks, and DVDs to children’s books, inspirational works, and historical scholarship.

The students who volunteered to participate in this year's exhibit are:

Nikhil Arora • Lois Maame Donkor Aryee • Bay Lauris ByrneSim • Emily K. Chan • Jordan Kastrinsky • Kyle P. McGoey • Bridget-Kate Sixkiller McNulty • Jimmy Ragan • Tyler Luis Rivera • Caroline Sohr • Jiyoung Song • Queenie Sukhadia • Robbie Tanner • Bryan David Thomson • Rui Zhang 

Exhibit design and photography by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. Many thanks to the fifteen students and interns who volunteered to participate in this exhibit, and to: Greg Potter, Research and Information Desk Coordinator; Goodie Corriveau, Acquisitions Assistant; Jillian Hinchliffe, Research & Instruction Services Information Associate; and Laura Braunstein, Digital Humanities and English Librarian, for their organizational help. 

Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall: June 8 - July 22, 2016



Daoist Ritual and Practice

Daoist Ritual and Practice exhibit poster

Exploring specific moments from the rich tapestry of religious culture in China, this exhibit shows different ways for interacting with the divine, attaining transcendence, and establishing community. This variety of ideas and practices hint at the complex interactions between traditions and communities in China, and beyond, and show the richness of religious life and experience, limited only by the human imagination.

Exhibit curated by Professor Gil Raz, Department of Religion; design by Dennis Grady, Library Education and Outreach. Video editing by Xiaofan Zhang, Jones Media Center Digital Media Assistant.
Cosponsored by the Religion Department, Dean of Faculty Office, and Baker-Berry Library.

Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: April 5 - June 24, 2016



Out of the Archive – Into the Streets: Dartmouth College, the Martín Chambi Archive, and the City of Cusco, Peru

Martin Chambi exhibit poster

Martín Chambi (1891-1973) is one of Latin America’s most renowned photographers. A Quechua-speaking native born in a small village in the vicinity of Lake Titicaca, Chambi considered himself the “representative of his race” and aspired to capture the entire gamut of life in the southern Peruvian Andes. Critics celebrate his exquisite and dramatic photographs of Machu Picchu and other archaeological sites, as well as his photographic manipulation of light and chiaroscuro that have earned him the title “painter of light.” 

The Martín Chambi Archive, in Cusco, Peru, holds more than 35,000 of the photographer’s glass plates,  which document the modernization and radical transformation of the region.  His images include the arrival of the first cars, the devastating earthquake of 1950, and members of all classes of society, from the chichera to the city’s elites. 

A Dartmouth – Martín Chambi Archive Collaboration

This Library exhibit, Out of the Archives – Into the Streets, showcases
Professor Silvia Spitta’s two-year collaboration with the Martín Chambi Archive. Thanks to a Dean of the Faculty Scholarly Innovation Grant, the project enabled the digitization of thousands of previously unseen glass plates, culminating with the city-wide exhibit El Cusco de Martín Chambi, in which thirty-two of Chambi’s iconic images were enlarged and set up in the streets. Argentine photographer Julio Pantoja documented the exhibit with the photographs included in this exhibit. 

The El Cusco de Martín Chambi exhibit underscored the importance —and the potential—of the archive as a source of cultural heritage, memory, and, ultimately, community. 

Out of the Archives - Into the Streets, curated by Professor Silvia Spitta, Jill Baron, and Dennis Grady, is offered in conjunction with Out of the Archive: Photography, Patrimony, and Performance in Latin America, an international conference generously sponsored by the Leslie Humanities Center, the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, the Associate Dean of the Arts and Humanities, the Hood Museum of Art, and the Native American Studies Program, April 14-15, 2016. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady.

Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall: April 1 - June 3, 2016



 Reading the Revolution - Late 20th Century Chinese Graphic Novels

Chinese Graphic Novels exhibit poster

Chinese graphic novels were first published in the 1920s. The popularity of these novels rose in the 1950s and peaked in late 1960s and 1970s, but continued to be published until the 1990s. During the 1960s and 1970s, when the Cultural Revolution swept throughout China, schools were closed and books were destroyed. For years, Mao Zedong’s writings, such as Quotations from Chairman  Mao Tse-tung (“Little Red Book”), became the predominant reading materials in  China. Under these peculiar historical  circumstances, graphic novels became a  major educational tool and source of  entertainment for young people, especially children. As most families lacked the  financial resources to purchase them for their children, most obtained the books by renting. Book stalls offered long benches and stools for children to sit and read.  The typical cost for renting a single volume was a penny or two.

It is not an exaggeration to say that graphic novels were indispensable to a Chinese  generation growing up during the 1950s  and 1960s.  Many children spent hours of their daily life reading them throughout their childhood. 

During a time when political turmoil  prevailed and cultural heritage deteriorated, graphic novels, through vivid images and  colorful storytelling, encouraged children’s imagination, gave them an alternative to  heavily political materials and enriched  their primary education. 

Since 2014, the Dartmouth College Library has selectively collected over a dozen  titles of Chinese graphic novels ranging  from 1957-1989 with the majority published  in the 1970’s. The examples in this exhibit  provide some insight into how millions of Chinese school aged children were educating themselves in the midst of political turmoil during the Cultural Revolution. In addition, they provide readers a glimpse of what  life was like under the circumstances and  serve as a testimony to the impacts these  movements brought to people and society.

Reading the Revolution: Late 20th Century Chinese Graphic Novels was curated by Nien Lin Xie, Librarian for East Asian Studies; design by Dennis Grady, Library Education and Outreach.

Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall: January 11 - March 11, 2016



A Lot of Good This Daylight's Gonna Do Us - Cult Cinema from 1968 to 1988: Three Directors

Cult Cinema exhibit poster

A Lot of Good This Daylight's Gonna Do Us - Cult Cinema from 1968 to 1988: Three Directors examines the work of John Carpenter, David Cronenberg, and George Romero within their larger cultural context. Curator Wesley Benash explains his long-standing interest in the subject:

"When I was six years old, by father let me rent Brian De Palma’s film Carrie from the video store.  It scared the hell out of me, but it also spawned a lifelong fascination with the shadowy, macabre underbelly of the cinema.  As a young boy and teenager, I was interested in these films for their sensational elements –violence, gore, and sex.  As I grew up, I began to appreciate them for their sociopolitical elements instead, and I came to understand how less reputable forms of cinema, such as the horror film and exploitation film, frequently had much to say about the societies in which they were produced.  As a student, I have parlayed this interest in cult film into scholarship; the admiration and appreciation I have for these films serves as the backbone of the thesis I am writing in Dartmouth’s Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program.

"The films on display, and others like them, tend to function as cinema’s id, forcing us to acknowledge the ugliness within society and within ourselves; it is for this reason that they repulse so many viewers.  But for those who are willing to open their minds to these films, they are equally audacious and enlightening.

"I obsessively watched the works of John Carpenter, David Cronenberg, and George Romero as a boy and teenager.  I think they are great artists and that their best work stands up to the finest products of Hollywood, Italian neorealism, the French New Wave, or any other period in cinema history.  It is my hope that upon viewing their work, you will feel the same."

Exhibit curated by Wesley Benash; design by Dennis Grady, Library Education and Outreach. 

Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: January 5 - March 11, 2016



 Christian Wolff: beginning anew with every ending

Christian Wolff exhibit poster

By the time he came to Dartmouth to teach Classics, Comparative Literature, and Music in 1971, Christian Wolff was already a world-renowned composer, as a member of the “New York School” of American composers with John Cage, Morton Feldman, Earle Brown, and David Tudor. He had played a key role in the revolution in music composition at mid-century when, at the age of 16, he gave a copy of The I Ching – or Book of Changes to his new-found composition teacher, John Cage. Cage had been searching for a way to rescue his music from his own preconceptions, aesthetic habits, and learned musical expectations. The I Ching provided a way, through the introduction of chance procedures into the process of composing music, for Cage to remove his own preferences from the process. As Kay Larson notes in Where the Heart Beats–John Cage, Zen Buddhism, and the Inner Life of Artists (NY: Penguin Press, 2012), “Christian’s gift of The I Ching—like a blessing that could never have been anticipated—made the revolution possible.”

This exhibit highlights key aspects of Christian Wolff’s works: indeterminacy, politics and collaboration; and celebrates the composer’s long association with Dartmouth College as a professor of music, classics and comparative literature. It is offered in conjunction with The Exception and the Rule: a Celebration of Christian Wolff Featuring International Contemporary Ensemble (Ice).

Exhibit curated and designed by Dennis Grady, with help from Pat Fisken, Head of Paddock Music Library; Joy Weale, Music Library Supervisor; Deborah Howe, Dartmouth Library Collections Conservator; Meghan Grela ’17; Reid Watson ’16; and Prajeet Bajpai ’16. Many thanks to Margaret Lawrence, Director of Programming at the Hopkins Center, for suggesting a Library exhibit to complement the Hopkins Center’s program, The Exception and the Rule:  A Celebration of Christian Wolff; to Alvin Lucier and Amy Beal for permission to use their insightful published writings; to Stephanie Berger and Gordon Mumma for their photographs; and most of all, of course, to Christian Wolff for his astonishing music and for his many generous contributions to this exhibit.

Read "Celebrating Dartmouth’s Musical Maverick" in Dartmouth Now.

 

Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall: September 18 - December 10, 2015

Exhibit reception: Thursday, October 22, 4PM.



Prepare Your Skeleton for the Air - Surrealism and the Spanish Avant-Garde in the Dartmouth College Library

Surrealism exhibit poster

Prepare Your Skeleton for the Air: Surrealism and the Spanish Avant-Garde in  the Dartmouth College Library coincides with the Department of Spanish & Portuguese conference “Dalí, Lorca & Buñuel in America,” October 15-17, 2015. The exhibit features materials from the Dartmouth Library’s collections that  display the influence of surrealism on the work of Salvador Dalí (1904-1989), Federico García Lorca (1898-1936), and Luis Buñuel (1900-1983). 

Our exhibit title, “Prepare Your Skeleton for the Air,” is from Federico Garcia Lorca’s poem “Ruin,” in his Poeta en Nueva York collection. The poem ends with these two stanzas:

Tú solo y yo quedamos.
Prepara tu esqueleto para el aire.
Yo solo y tú quedamos.

Prepara tu esqueleto.
Hay que buscar de prisa, amor, de prisa,
nuestro perfil sin sueño.

------

You alone and I remain.
Prepare your skeleton for the air.
I alone and you remain.

Prepare your skeleton.
One must look quickly, love, quickly,
for our profile without sleep.  

Exhibit curated by Jill Baron, Romance Languages and Literature Librarian, with help from José del Pino, Dartmouth Professor of Spanish; design by Dennis Grady, Library Education and Outreach; document and book preparation by Deborah Howe, Library Collections Conservator. 

Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: October 8 - December 11, 2015

Exhibit reception: Friday, October 16, 5:30PM.



 Student Library Service Bookplate Program

2015 Student Bookplate exhibit poster

Dartmouth Class of 2015

The Student Library Service Bookplate Program honors the Library’s graduating student employees by inviting them to choose books and other items for the Library’s collections. Each item will receive a bookplate that acknowledges the student’s selection and honors his or her service to the Library. Students are eligible if they worked at least two terms in any Library department (including RWIT, The Student Center for Research, Writing and Information Technology). 

The Library is honoring over fifty students from the class of 2015 with selections ranging from world fiction, cookbooks, and DVDs to children’s books, inspirational works, and historical scholarship. This exhibit features sixteen students who have volunteered to share their thoughts with the Dartmouth community.

For more about the Bookplate Program go to Dartmouth Now.

Baker-Berry Library / Baker Main Hall: June 12 - August 30, 2015

Exhibit design and photography by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. Many thanks to the students and interns who volunteered to participate in this exhibit, and to Greg Potter, Research and Information Desk Coordinator, for his organizational help.

This year's exhibit participants:

Karen Afre, Leandra Barrett, Emily Estelle, Ben Ferguson, Addison Himmelberger, Gavin Huang, Mitchell Jacobs, Diane Jang, Faizan Kanji, Courtney Kelly, Abbie Kouzmanoff, Justin Lee, Katie Lunt, Claire Pendergrast, Eva Petzinger, and Katie Williamson.



Geographies: New England Book Work

Geographies exhibit poster

The New England Chapter of The Guild of Book Workers

This exhibition displays a wide range of work from the members of the Guild of Book Workers’ New England chapter. The pieces relate to the show’s theme of New England, with entrants interpreting that theme as they wished. The 26 works in this exhibition span a range of contemporary book work— fine and design bindings, traditional and creative bookbinding, artist books and calligraphic manuscripts, and incorporate a variety of materials and production methods. Some members have created both the content and structure, while others have used an existing text as the basis for their work.

The Guild of Book Workers is a national organization founded in 1906 that brings together people involved in all the book arts. The New England Chapter, one of ten regional chapters with 180 members, organizes programs within the region, such as lectures, workshops, and exhibitions.  

Many thanks to Jay Satterfield for his help in choosing some related items from the Rauner Special Collections Library to exhibit at this venue alongside the NEGBW show. Thanks also to Deborah Howe, Tessa Gadomski, and Dennis Grady for their assistance. Exhibition curated by Stephanie Wolff, Preservation Services, Dartmouth College Library and NEGBW Exhibitions Coordinator.  



Baker-Berry Library / Berry Main Street: April 6 - August 21, 2015

The Secret Revealed - The Book Arts Workshop at 25 Years

Book Arts exhibit poster

Often called Dartmouth’s best-kept secret the Book Arts Workshop in Baker Library is celebrating its 25th anniversary. Created in 1989-1990 by Edward Connery Lathem, '51, Rocky Stinehour, '50, and Mark Lansburgh, '49, three former students of Professor Emeritus Ray Nash, the studio is located in the former location of Nash’s Graphic Arts Program, Baker Library Room 21-23. From its early beginnings of letterpress instruction the workshop has grown to include book binding and curricular support of the arts of the book.

Baker-Berry Library / Baker Main Hall: March 20 - June 5, 2015

Curated by Barbara R. Sagraves, Preservation Services, and Sarah Smith, Book Arts Workshop. Designed by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. Materials preparation by Pat Cope and Phyllis Gilbert, Rauner Special Collections Library, and Deborah Howe and Stephanie Wolff, Preservation Services.  Special thanks to Jay Satterfield, Rauner Special Collections Library, and Jeff Horrell, Dartmouth College Libraries, for their invaluable suggestions.



The Design Work of Alvin Eisenman '43

Alvin Eisenman exhibit poster

The design work of the long-time director of the first graduate program in graphic design in America.

This exhibition highlights Alvin Eisenman's design work before and during his career as a design educator at the Yale School of Art for over 40 years. For a better understanding of the sources and influences that led to the creation of the seminal academic program in graphic design in America, this show includes some of Eisenman's earlier and lesser-known works. The exhibit also serves to display the role and range of a professional book designer. Included below is a link to a video tribute to Eisenman by his former student, Garson Yu.

In conjunction with this exhibition, this year's Stephen Harvard Memorial Lecture featured a talk by Douglass Scott on Eisenman's role in the rise of the modern graphic design profession in the post-WWII era. Scott, a former student and teaching colleague of Eisenman at Yale, is a designer, design educator, and former creative director at WGBH, the PBS affiliate in Boston. The talk was sponsored by The Friends of the Dartmouth College Library.

Exhibition curated by Won K. Chung ’73 and based on an earlier exhibit by John T. Hill. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. Photographs by John Hill. Special thanks to Sara Eisenman and the Eisenman family, and to Thomas Strong ’60 for their assistance and loan of materials.

Baker-Berry Library / Baker Main Hall: December 19, 2014-March 15, 2015

[Image: Broadside, 17" x 22", designed by Alvin Eisenman as part of the portfolio, Homage to the Book, New York: West Virginia Pulp & Paper Company, 1968. Rauner Library collection.]

Alvin Eisenman - A Video Tribute by Garson Yu



Meet DALI

DALI Lab exhibit poster

The Neukom DALI Lab was founded in April 2013. This exhibition highlights some of the amazing work students have done in the lab since.

Exhibition curation and design by Runi Goswami ‘13 MS ’15. Videos by Delainey Ackerman ‘15, Jake Gaba ’16, and Nook Harquail ‘14 MS ’15. Mechanical gear wall by Luke Zirngibl ‘14 MS ’15.

Installed by Marissa Allen ‘14 MS ’15, Runi Goswami ‘13 MS ’15, Nook Harquail ‘14 MS ’15, Malika Khurana ‘15, Ryan Smith '14, and Tim Tregubov ’11 MS’15.

Baker-Berry Library / Berry Main Street: January 21 - March 31, 2015

 

For more information on the Neukom DALI Lab, visit http://dali.dartmouth.edu/



Teaching and Learning at Dartmouth - Then & Now

DCAL 10th exhibit poster

 

Celebrating the Dartmouth Center for Advancement of Learning 10th Anniversary 2004-2014

An exhibit tracing the evolution of teaching and learning at Dartmouth, from the 18th Century to the present. 
Curated by Prudence Merton, Associate Director for Faculty Programs and Assessment at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning; Susan Simon, Media Learning Technologist, Jones Media Center; and Sarah Decker, MALS graduate student.

Exhibit design by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. Many thanks to the staff of Rauner Special Collections Library and to Deborah Howe, Dartmouth Library Conservator.

Baker-Berry Library / Berry Main Street: October 21 - December 12, 2014

Images: John Smith lecture notes on Natural Philosophy, 1778. Rauner Special Collections Library; Tiltfactor Student Programmer Rebecca Leong '15, with a game she programmed, "POX: Save the Puppies," a variation of titlfactor's award-winning POX game series, 
in collaboration with an Australian veterinarian. Photo: S.Punjasthitkul / tiltfactor. 
More info: www.tiltfactor.org/puppypox/ .



Seen and Unseen: Picturing Race, Gender, and the Enemy in WWI Posters 

Seen & Unseen poster

World War I propaganda posters primarily promoted the war, recruited troops, and raised money for the war effort. With these aims, it is not surprising that they did not reflect many aspects of the war effort or many of the people involved. This exhibition examines several of the subjects ignored by these propaganda campaigns. By exploring the five themes of masculinity, women, the enemy, victims, and race, the exhibition draws attention to the disconnect between reality and what is depicted in these posters. To fill in the missing picture, the posters are juxtaposed with other images from World War I. By offering a closer look at messages embedded in World War I posters, this exhibit challenges viewers to think critically and ask questions about images of war.

Seen and Unseen: Picturing Race, Gender, and the Enemy in WWI Posters was organized by Winnie Yoe, Homma Family Intern, and Sara Trautz, Mellon Special Project Intern, at the Hood Museum of Art. They would like to thank the Hood Museum of Art, especially their supervisors Katherine Hart and Amelia Kahl. In addition they would like to thank Dennis Grady of the Dartmouth College Library for the exhibition design; Laura Barrett, Director of Education and Outreach, Dartmouth College Library; Margaret Darrow, Professor of History, for her expertise on World War I; and Bruce Hunter for giving them access to his extensive collection of World War I artifacts. Most of the posters are reproductions of works in the Hood Museum of Art collection.

Baker Library Main Hall: September 24 to December 19, 2014

Made possible by the generous support of the Harrington Gallery Fund

Join Winnie Yoe '14 and Sara Trautz '15 for a gallery talk on their installation Seen and Unseen: Picturing Race, Gender, and the Enemy in WWI Posters: Friday, October 3, 4:00pm, Baker Main Hall.



   Student Library Service Bookplate Program - Dartmouth Class of 2014

Student Bookplate exhibit poster

The Student Library Service Bookplate Program honors the Library's graduating student employees by inviting them to choose books and other items for the Library's collections. Each item will receive a bookplate that acknowledges the student's selection and honors his or her service to the Library. Students are eligible if they worked at least two terms in any Library department (including RWIT, The Student Center for Research, Writing and Information Technology). The Library will honor nearly seventy students from the class of 2014 with selections ranging from world fiction, cookbooks, and DVDs to children's books, inspirational works, and historical scholarship.

This exhibit highlights the selections of fourteen of our graduating student employees: Ala' Alrababa'h • Jenny Che • Kathleen Chung • Erik Fagerstrom • Taylor Johnson • Malcolm Leverett • Andrew Longhi • Diana Ming • Juliana Park • Karl Schutz • Isana Skeete • Shaozhong Wang • Shermaine Waugh • Kelly Wood

Many thanks to the graduating students who volunteered to participate in this exhibit, and to Greg Potter, Research and Information Desk Coordinator, and Goodie Corriveau, Acquisitions Assistant, for their help in organizing the students and their selections.

Exhibit & poster design: Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach.

Berry Main Street: June 4 - August 31, 2014



"They Played Here?!"

Ellington

Really? They played here? Yep, they really did. Take a break from the summer heat and explore some of the amazing popular music acts that performed at Dartmouth, all when they were hot (and your parents were young). From the likes of Benny Goodman, Billie Holiday and Artie Shaw in the 1930s, through to the Ronettes, Bruce Springsteen, the Grateful Dead, and road master Dave Matthews. This exhibit mines the archives to feature some of Dartmouth's most memorable concerts.

The exhibit was curated by Jay Satterfield, Rauner Special Collections Library, and Hazel-Dawn Dumpert, Occom Circle Project Manager. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach.

Read the Rauner Library blog post.

Baker Library Main Hall: June 6 to August 31, 2014.

Photo: Duke Ellington, Green Key Prom, May 4, 1946.



   Edmund Husserl and Phenomenology

Husserl exhibit poster

Edmund Husserl (1859-1938) envisaged phenomenology as a task to be undertaken through the collaborative work of a community of thinkers. He considered philosophers to be the 'functionaries of mankind': those whose responsibility was to reflect on thought itself—be it everyday, scientific, or philosophical. This exhibit, organized in collaboration with the Husserl Archives, Leuven, Belgium, celebrates Husserl's philosophy and seeks to familiarize the Dartmouth community with his work and important legacy. The exhibit is offered in conjunction with the 45th Annual Meeting of the Husserl Circle, to be held at Dartmouth on May 28-31, 2014.

Curated by Smaranda Aldea and sponsored by the Office of the Dean of Libraries. Exhibit & poster design: Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. Thanks to Bill Fontaine, Philosophy & Religion Reference Bibliographer.

Berry Main Street: March 31 - June 2, 2014



   A Visible War - French & Italian Perspectives on World War I

WWI exhibit poster

This display on the Great War emphasizes the various ways in which WWI and its context were interpreted and represented by both public institutions and private individuals. The exhibit was inspired by "Specters of the Great War," a conference to be hosted by the French and Italian Department from May 15 through May 17, 2014. The six windows that comprise the exhibit are a testimony to the collaborative spirit of the Dartmouth community: at least a dozen participants, including members of the French and Italian, History, Comparative Literature, and Art History departments, as well librarians and staff from the Library and Hood Museum, worked together to create this multi-faceted perspective on the war.

Contributors:

Jill Baron, Librarian for Romance Languages & Literatures, Latin American Studies
Francis Oscadal, Librarian for History, Government and Law
Morgan Swan, 
Special Collections Education and Outreach Librarian
Margaret Darrow, Professor of History
Graziella Parati, Paul D. Paganucci Chair of Italian Literature and 
Language, Chair of the Department of French and Italian, Professor of Comparative Literature and Women's and Genders Studies
Katherine Hart, Senior Curator of Collections and the Barbara C. and Harvey P. Hood 1918 Curator of Academic Programming
Katherine Hornstein, Assistant Professor of Art History
Yasser Elhariry, 
Assistant Professor of French
Andrea Tarnowski, Associate Professor of French & Comparative Literature
Lucas Hollister, Assistant Professor of French
Carla Galarza, Jones Memorial Digital Media Intern

The exhibit was curated by Morgan Swan and Jill Baron. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach.

Baker Library Main Hall: April 4 - June 2, 2014

Image: a page from A La Baïonnette, July 8, 1915. "America ought to help capture the mad dog of Europe."



   Dartmouth is Celebrating 50 Years - BASIC & Time Sharing

BASIC exhibit poster

May 1, 2014 marks 50 years since Dartmouth College Mathematics Professors John Kemeny and Thomas Kurtz, together with a number of talented Dartmouth undergraduates, made computing history when they successfully launched the computer language BASIC (Beginners' All Purpose Symbolic Instruction Code), which went on to become the most widely used computer language in the world.

As part of Dartmouth's 50-year celebration of the birth of BASIC, this exhibit features photographs and documents from Rauner Special Collections Library.

Exhibit curated and written by Amelia Raether '13, Presidential Fellow, Office of the Provost, and Henrike Frowein, Project Specialist, Office of the Provost. Designed by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach..

Berry Library Brickway: April 15 - May 5, 2014



   Dartmouth College Library Collections Showcase


Collections Showcase exhibit posterIf you're a member of the Dartmouth community, you probably have a stack of reading that you've been meaning to catch up on. Maybe you read reviews and add e-books to your tablet, thinking that you'll get in some great reading the next time you have a long trip. Perhaps you're a traditionalist and keep a stack of books on your bedside table or on the corner of your desk. In somewhat neat piles on the floor in front of the already overflowing bookshelves in your office or at home... If one or more of these images seems guiltily familiar, you may not wish to have the Library top off your reading backlog with the 52,000-plus titles we purchased last year. Where to start?

Help is on the way. To whet your appetite, librarians have selected for your attention some new titles that offer something unexpected: a spotlight on a neglected master; a graphic novel on imagined and unimaginable loss; a calm, cogent voice slicing through hot debate; an accessible recounting of the history of the universe, from ancient galaxies to the discovery of water on Mars; and what's for lunch. And much more.

For the most part, this selection of 2013 titles is readable by all members of that delightful French book review class called "the cultivated public". This, of course, is you. We hope that you find something delectable that you might not have heard about otherwise.

-Elizabeth Kirk, Associate Librarian for Information Resources

Contributors to Dartmouth College Library Collections Showcase: 

Jill Baron, Librarian for Romance Languages & Latin American Studies
Laura Braunstein, Librarian for English and Writing
John Cocklin, Librarian for Economics and Social Sciences Data
Pat Fisken, Head of Paddock Music Library
Bill Fontaine, Librarian for Philosophy & Religion
Laura Graveline, Visual Arts Librarian
Lucinda M. Hall, Librarian for Human Geography, Cartography & Maps, Television & Radio
Elizabeth Kirk, Associate Librarian for Information Resources
Fran Oscadal, Librarian for History, Government, General Social Sciences
Jane Quigley, Head of Kresge Physical Sciences Library
Jay Satterfield, Special Collections Librarian, History of the Book Selector
Peggy Sleeth, Associate Director, Information Resources, Biomedical Libraries
Reinhart Sonnenburg, Librarian for German, Classics, and Linguistics
Amy Witzel, Librarian for African & African American Studies, Anthropology, Education, Native American Studies, Sociology, and Women & Gender Studies
Nien Lin Xie, Librarian for East Asian Studies
Shirley Zhao, Physical Sciences Librarian

Exhibit & poster design: Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach

 Baker Main Hall: January 20 - February 28, 2014; Berry Main Street: January 20 - March 28, 2014



 Chinese Calligraphy and Manuscript Art


Chinese Calligraphy and Manuscript Art exhibit posterChinese calligraphy is a traditional art form expressing ancient Chinese cosmological, religious and philosophical notions in addition to aesthetic and literary ideas. With the generous support of the Office of the President and the Office of the Provost, as part of Dartmouth’s Year of the Arts initiative in collaboration with the Dean of the Faculty, this exhibition presents the major scripts (seal, clerical, standard, running, and cursive) of Chinese calligraphy and manuscript art.Year of the Aerts logo Co-sponsors of this project include the Office of the President, the Office of the Provost, the Dean of the Faculty, the Leslie Center for the Humanities, the Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Program, the Hood Museum of Art, the Education and Outreach Program of Dartmouth College Library, the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Literatures, the Studio Art Department, and the Robert 1932 and Barbara Black Professorship in Asian Studies.

Chinese Calligraphy and Manuscript Art was curated by Wen Xing, Robert 1932 and Barbara Black Professor in Asian Studies. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. Many thanks to Nien Lin Xie, Dartmouth College Librarian for East Asian Studies, and Laura Barrett, Director of Library Education & Outreach, for their valuable assistance.

Baker Main Hall, August 30 - December 23, 2013



The Grassy Knoll Revisited - On the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy


JFK poster

Fifty years after the fact, the facts themselves, filtered and funneled into diverse theories, have persisted in various permutations without ever reaching a final denouement. The Warren Commission, convened by Lyndon Johnson days after the assassination, issued its non-conspiracy theory less than a year later in 26 volumes of testimony and exhibits and the 888-page Report of the President's Commission on the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The Commission's conclusion, that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone, has been doubted and disputed since the day it was issued.

This exhibit surveys many of the holdings of Baker-Berry and Rauner Libraries that pertain to the assassination, and includes the digital forensic analysis of the famous Oswald backyard photo presented by Dartmouth Professor Hany Farid.

The Grassy Knoll Revisited - On the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy was curated and designed by Dennis Grady. Video editing by Carla Galarza, Jones Memorial Digital Media Intern.

 

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, September 25 - December 20, 2013



Victorious Secret - Elite Olympic Champions as Dancing Bikini Girls: an installation by Angela Lorenz


Victorious Secret exhibit posterArtist Angela Lorenz's mosaic triptychs Victorious Secret, based on Roman mosaics from 300AD, will be on display on Berry Main Street August 30 - December 1, 2013. In this work, Lorenz takes an entertaining approach to visually addressing misinterpretations of the original images.

"It is revelatory to me, an ice hockey player from age 4, competing against boys in tennis and hockey at age 10, that noble Romans were promoting athletic competition as an ideal for women almost 2,000 years ago. That this imagery has attracted so much attention for the superficial aspect of the womenís novel and titillating garments completely subverts the original intentions of these mosaics."  -Angela Lorenz

We are very fortunate that Lorenz will be visiting Dartmouth to deliver a talk on her work. Her talk will encompass the process of making the original mosaics and the process she used to recreate the ancient images out of buttons and hairpins. She will explain the archeological context of the original mosaics and will convey the erroneous and intended interpretations of them, based on research published by Italian archeologist Isabella Baldini Lippolis.

Additionally, Lorenz will show the artist's book in 41 copies that she created to accompany the nine panels and to commemorate the passage of Title IX in 1972, the same year Dartmouth went co-ed. In honor of the inaugural venue of Victorious Secret, the book displays a Dartmouth pennant on the cover.

Brickway Gallery, Berry Library, August 30 - December 1, 2013

Artist's talk: Wednesday October 30, 4:30pm Current Periodicals Room, Baker-Berry Library

At Rauner Library: Angela Lorenz: A Sampler



Exhibit Posters - Dartmouth Library Education & Outreach Tenth Anniversary


Victorious Secret exhibit posterSince 2002, the Dartmouth College Library's Education & Outreach Program has mounted over 100 exhibits in Baker Main Hall, Berry Main Street, Berry Brickway Gallery, and Gallery 183. Exhibits in the Baker Hall and Berry Main Street cases showcase the Library's collections to the College community and the general public, contribute to academic conferences or events on campus, and illustrate the intersections between the Library's resources and teaching and learning at Dartmouth. Faculty, students, staff and members of the community have all collaborated on these exhibits.

In celebration of the Education & Outreach Program's tenth anniversary, this exhibit features selected posters from a decade of collaborations. Posters and exhibit design by Dennis Grady..

Gallery 183, Berry Library, October 14 - November 27, 2013



Two Rivers Printmaking Studio: Portfolios 2004-2012


Two Rivers Exhibit poster

Two Rivers Printmaking Studio has celebrated the fine art of hand-pulled printmaking in a well-equipped, light-filled studio in White River Junction, Vermont, for over a decade. The art in this exhibit is from a portfolio that Two Rivers produces periodically.

Two Rivers Printmaking Studio: Portfolios 2004-2012 was curated by Lois Beatty, Judy Lampe, and Elizabeth Mayor. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady and Sheri Hancock-Tomek.

 

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, May 20 - August 30, 2013



 Student Library Service Bookplate Program - Dartmouth Class of 2013


Student Bookplate exhibit posterThe Student Library Service Bookplate program honors the Library's graduating student employees by inviting them to choose books and other items for the Library's collections. Each item receives a bookplate that acknowledges the student's selection and honors his or her service to the Library. Students are eligible if they worked at least four terms in any Library department (including RWIT, The Student Center for Research, Writing and Information Technology).

The Library is honoring over seventy students from the class of 2013 with selections ranging from world fiction, cookbooks, and DVDs to children's books, inspirational works, and historical scholarship. This exhibit features fifteen students who have volunteered to share their thoughts with the Dartmouth community..

Exhibit designed and produced by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach.

Baker Main Hall, June 5 – August 30, 2013



Harvey Frommer - Writing Baseball


Harvey Frommer - Writing Baseball posterWriting Baseball, a multimedia exhibit based on the writings and collections of MALS professor Harvey Frommer, was on display from June 17-July 31 along the brickway on the first floor of Berry Library. The exhibit centered on three themes: "Old Time Baseball," "Red Sox vs. Yankees," and "Breaking Baseball's Color Line," all of which were evoked through Professor Frommer's writings, photographs and display of memorabilia.

A widely published and well-known sports author and oral historian, Frommer is the author of 41 baseball books including Remembering Yankee Stadium and Remembering Fenway Park.

Harvey Frommer - Writing Baseball was curated by Harvey Frommer and Andrea Bartelstein. Designed by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach.

Brickway Gallery, Berry Library, June 17 – July 31, 2013




Dartmouth's Native American Studies Program - The First 40 Years


NAS exhibit posterNative American Studies seeks to increase understanding of the historical experiences, systems of knowledge, cultural traditions and innovations, and political aspirations of Native peoples. The program accomplishes this through the active scholarship of its faculty, a robust offering of courses, support of independent study and internship opportunities relating to indigenous peoples, academic conferences and active engagement with partners at Dartmouth and beyond.

This exhibit celebrates the first forty years of the Native American Studies Program at Dartmouth.

Curated by N. Bruce Duthu, Samson Occom Professor of Native American Studies; Colin G. Calloway, The John Kimball, Jr. 1943 Professor of History and Professor of Native American Studies; with Andi Bartelstein, Education & Outreach Librarian. Designed by Dennis Grady. Poster photograph by Joseph Mehling '69.

Brickway Gallery, Berry Library, May 10 - June 16, 2013




Designed and Printed at the Stinehour Press


Stinehour exhibit posterRural Vermont seems an unlikely place to find a commercial printer dedicated to impeccable design and the craft of book making, but it was in Lunenburg that Roderick Stinehour '50 established one of the finest commercial printing houses in America.

Founded in Dartmouth's Graphic Arts Workshop, the successful Stinehour Press achieved a level of quality associated with the fine press tradition, while remaining commercially viable. This exhibit shows how Stinehour's commitment to excellent design kept the Press consistently relevant through a period of intense technological change in the industry. From hot-metal typesetting to digital production, every issue of the Press lived up to Stinehour's high standards.

Designed and Printed at the Stinehour Press was curated by Jay Satterfield, Rauner Special Collections Library, and Stephanie Wolff, Preservation Services. Designed and produced by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. Materials preparation by Deborah Howe, Preservation Services.

Baker Main Hall, March 18 – May 31, 2013




MULTIPLE REFLECTIONS: REPRESENTING GRIMMS' TALES - On the Bicentennial of the First Publication Of
Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm's Kinder- Und Hausmärchen


Grimm exhibit posterThe Harris German-Dartmouth Distinguished Professorship has joined with the Goethe-Institut San Francisco and German American Artists to showcase artwork commissioned to celebrate the 200 year anniversary of the Grimm Fairy Tales.
The ten artists featured in this exhibit were given the freedom to focus on any theme or story in the Fairy Tales that inspired them.  They have created diverse paintings, collages, photographs, paper cuttings, and book art influenced by the Grimm Brothers' collection of folk tales, one of the most widely read works of German literature.

Contributing Artists: Karin Blobel, Rena Buchgraber, Chris Ehlers, Hilla Hueber, Inge Infante, Susanne Kaspar, Katja Leibenath, Bettina Pauly, Heike Seefeldt, and Anne Siems

The tales have inspired a wide variety of artists, illustrators, and writers over the past 200 years. To accompany the artworks presented here, we have selected images and texts from the collections of Baker-Berry and Rauner Libraries, multiple reflections and interpretations of the stories collected in Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm's Kinder- und Hausmärchen.

The Harris Professorship was created in 1987 to promote a deeper understanding between Dartmouth College and Germany. During the past twenty-five years the program has sponsored over one hundred German visitors in government, science, humanities, and the arts.

Multiple Reflections: Representing Grimms' Tales was curated by Reinhart Sonnenburg and Dennis Grady. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady.

Baker Main Hall, January 31–March 15, 2013




 

On the Eve of Destruction (Again) – Envisioning the End of the World

Apocalypse posterPredictions of the end of the world routinely capture widespread attention. In 2011, Harold Camping's dates for Judgment Day and the Rapture came and went. This year, the Mayan Long Count Calendar comes to an end on December 21st (or maybe the 23rd), and while some spiritual guides anticipate a time of transformation and renewal, others expect it to usher in world destruction.

This exhibit highlights the deep millenarian currents that course through Western culture and notes the attempts of the Millerites and Harold Camping to discern the final day of reckoning. It presents examples of apocalyptic imagery from the medieval and early modern periods, followed by contemporary works by artists outside the artistic guild, and finishing with a whirlwind tour of cataclysmic themes in cinema.

On the Eve of Destruction (Again) – Envisioning the End of the World was curated by William Fontaine, Laura Braunstein, and Dennis Grady with help from Jay Satterfield (Rauner Special Collections), Matt Castellana (Jones Media Center), Deborah Howe (Library Preservation), and photographer Ted Degener. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady.

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, September 3 - December 3, 2012




Student Library Service Bookplate Program

Student Bookplate poster

The Student Library Service Bookplate program honors the Library's graduating student employees by inviting them to choose books and other items for the Library's collections. Each item receives a bookplate that acknowledges the student's selection and honors his or her service to the Library. Students are eligible if they worked at least four terms in any Library department (including RWIT, The Student Center for Research, Writing and Information Technology). The Library honored over seventy students from the class of 2012 with selections ranging from world fiction, graphic novels, and DVDs to children's books, inspirational works, and historical scholarship.

Exhibit design and photography: Dennis Grady – Library Education & Outreach. Many thanks to Greg Potter, Research and Information Desk Coordinator, and to the twelve students who volunteered to participate in this exhibit.

Baker Main Hall, July 1 - August 31, 2012




African Witchcraft and Healing

African Witchcraft

This exhibit, based on Norman Miller 's new book, Encounters with Witchcraft: Field Notes from Africa, includes 70 photos, maps, documents, art objects, and a video made by African students.

A "gallery talk" will occur in the Current Periodicals Room, Baker Berry, on May 10th at 4pm, with a book signing to follow on Berry Main Street at 5pm. Refreshments will be served. The talk will include brief readings from the book, a five minute video, slides and comments on how the book was made.

Miller has produced seven books, all on Africa, plus some 28 educational films for the National Science Foundation. He is one of America's early African area specialists, having spent 12 years in East Africa in the course of 26 research and teaching trips. He has taught at Dartmouth since 1980 in Community and Family Medicine and the Environmental Studies Department. The Book is available at the Dartmouth Book Store and will be on display at the exhibit..

Exhibit curated by Norman Miller; designed by Dennis Grady.
Related exhibits: Witchcraft Art, Devil Art, and Makonde Art, in Sherman Art Library, and Solutions to Witchcraft Violence, in Berry Library Room 183.

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, May 1- July 31, 2012




Of Course You're Going to the Expo! - World's Fairs in Baker Hall

Expo poster

An exhibit curated by Sydney Ayers '13 • Emily Glassberg '13 • Lolly Langman GR • Liz Neill '13 Stoney Portis GR • Kenji Praepipatmongkol '13 • Rain Wang GR with Professor Michelle Warren • COLT 73/101 Winter 2012 .

 

Designed by Dennis Grady.

Baker Main Hall, April 23 - June 25, 2012




Dickens at 200: Sketches, Curiosities, Expectations

Dickens at 200 poster

Charles Dickens was one of the most beloved and influential authors of the nineteenth century. Dickens sketched a "curiosity shop" of characters and managed his readers' "great expectations" to help us understand Victorian England. This exhibit celebrates the 200th anniversary of his birth by showcasing items from the Dartmouth College Library's collections.

 

"Dickens at 200" was curated by Laura Braunstein and designed by Dennis Grady.

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, February 6 - April 27, 2012




Latin America 1810-2011: The Independence Effect - El efecto independentista

The Independence Effect poster

This fall three major events that deal with Latin America as a recurring geographical and historical place are being organized at Dartmouth College: a film festival—The New England Festival of Ibero-American Cinema—was held at Dartmouth in its 2011 edition; a regional conference—the 2011 Annual Meeting of the New England Council of Latin American Studies on November 5, at the Rockefeller Center; and an international symposium—The Independence Effect: 200 Years of Cultural and Intellectual Processes sponsored by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, October 27-29.

The library welcomes these events, and offers that by acquiring, collecting, and disseminating important resources about Latin America, the library fulfills one of its principal missions—to support the very existence of these activities. This exhibit takes the leitmotif of the international symposium's theme in order to open a space for reflection about, first, the notion of what Latin America was in 1810—at the precise moment when processes began that gave rise to the diverse independence movements, and second, how these Hispanic and the Lusophone countries have evolved since then to arrive at today's realities.

With this exhibit, the library collaborates in these events, and more importantly forwards its own principal aim, which is to show students in particular how libraries collect material over time that can be relevant in answering contemporary academic questions. Baker-Berry Library—as do other academic libraries— also has the responsibility of making these resources accessible to its users. Each window analyses an aspect of the theme of the symposium to offer a sample of the riches of our library holdings. Our hope is to provoke reflection among students that will inspire them to use the library's vast resources.

Exhibit curated by Miguel Vallandares, Romance Languages Bibliographer; designed by Dennis Grady.

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, October 26 - January 5, 2012




Investing in Women and Girls: An Exhibit Presented by Dartmouth College Library in Conjunction with The Eighth Annual Great Issues in Medicine and Global Health Symposium

Investing in Women and Girls poster

"Investing in Women and Girls" is the topic of the Eighth Annual Great Issues in Medicine and Global Health Symposium. This year's program was developed by an interdisciplinary Planning Committee with representatives from Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Dartmouth College including Dartmouth Medical School and The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, The Dartmouth Center for Health Care Delivery Science, Amos Tuck School of Business, as well as community partners devoted to the well-being of women and girls.

Women and girls continue to be disadvantaged by lack of access to health care, education, financial services, property, and power. This exhibit includes photos, videos, and artifacts about local, national, and global programs as well as a sample of Dartmouth programs that invest in women and girls.

For more information on the Symposium visit www.dartmouth-hitchcock.org/great-issues-symposium/.

Exhibit curated by Mary Turco, Director of the Center for Continuing Education in the Health Sciences and Continuing Medical Education and Assistant Professor of Medicine, Dartmouth Medical School/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, in collaboration with Planning Committee members and colleagues in Jones Media Library. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady. Video editing and interactive presentation design by Tara Albanese, Digital Media Assistant, Jones Media Center.

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, November 16, 2011 - January 31, 2012




Indian Country Still

Indian Country Still poster

This exhibit traces the history of Native American soverignty through the concepts of Nationhood, Home, Generations, and Voices, drawing on a variety of sources available in Baker-Berry Library. The exhibit complements the Lewis and Clark traveling exhibit running concurrently in Berry Library.

Exhibit curated by Amy Witzell and designed by Dennis Grady.

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, September 5 - October 31, 2011




Together in the Great Alone... Thomas Orde Lees, Ernest Shackleton, and the 1914-16 Transantarctic Expedition

Thomas Orde Lees poster

After failing to reach the South Pole in 1909 by only a little over 100 miles during his Nimrod Expedition, Ernest Shackleton (1874-1922) set out to be the first to cross the continent. The plan was to sail the Endurance to the Peninsula region (south of Chile), march to the South Pole, and then continue to the McMurdo Sound (south of New Zealand), where the Aurora and the Ross Sea support party awaited. Disaster struck—the Endurance became trapped in pack ice in the Weddell Sea, never reaching the continent. She was crushed and sank on November 21, 1915, stranding crewman Thomas Orde Lees and 27 others. After months of living on the sea ice, the crew set out in April in three small open boats to reach the uninhabited Elephant Island. Shackleton, fearing his crew might never be found, selected five men to sail 800 miles in a small open boat to a whaling station on South Georgia Island to engage a rescue ship for the Endurance crew. Many consider Shackleton's boat journey the most amazing feat of open water navigation and survival in maritime history. His was the last expedition of the Heroic Age of Antarctic exploration.

Thomas Orde Lees (1877-1958), responsible for ship stores and the experimental motorized sledges, was perhaps the least popular member of the expedition. He did however, keep one of the expedition's most complete journals and was an ardent admirer of "Sir Ernest" and his leadership. Orde Lees's journal is one of many historically significant documents in the Stefansson Collection on Polar Exploration, housed in the Rauner Special Collections Library.

This exhibit offers a glimpse of Orde Lees's observations, hopes, and doubts as he endured and survived the expedition. It is offered in support of Phantom Limb's performance of 69°S. at The Hopkins Center on September 30th and October 1st. For more information on Phantom Limb go to www.dartmouth.edu/~phantomlimb/.

Exhibit curated by Ross Virginia, Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science and Director of the Dickey Center's Institute of Arctic Studies, and Dennis Grady. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady.

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, September 16 - October 21, 2011




A Passion for Perfection: Ann Lee and the Shakers

Shaker poster

Despite the Shakers' commitment to living separately, this comparatively small Utopian religious movement has had a tremendous impact on the larger world. Products of consecrated Shaker lives have attracted and inspired generations of non-Shaker artists, artisans and spiritual seekers. Principles of design and construction that informed Shaker material culture are directly related to Shaker spiritual and temporal values. "Anything may, with strict propriety be called perfect, which perfectly answers the purpose for which it was designed" and "Beauty rests on utility" are only two of many aphorisms that inform the material world they created to support their religious vision.

This exhibit, drawing on materials housed in Rauner Special Collections Library and Mary Ann Haagen's independent research, is offered in support of Angel Reapers, a multi-disciplinary work by Martha Clarke and Alfred Uhr suggested by the life of Ann Lee, at The Hopkins Center for the Arts on October 7 & 8, 2011

Exhibit curated by Mary Ann Haagen,Visiting Scholar, Music Department. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady.

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, September 23 - October 21, 2011




To Find Oneself Again ... fragments from the real world

Fragments poster

The title of this exhibette is borrowed from Antonin Artaud's The Nerve Meter:

"To find oneself again in a state of extreme shock, clarified by unreality, with, in a corner of oneself, some fragments of the real world."

In the present instance, the fragments were revealed during the repair of broken bindings in the Library's general collections, and collected by Stephanie Wolff, Conservation Technician, Preservation Services, Dartmouth College Library. Each fragment implies a world; together, they generate a multiplicity of universes. 

This exhibit is offered in support of the Brentano String Quartet's Fragments, a New England Premiere/Co-Commission performance at the Hopkins Center for the Arts, Spaulding Auditorium, Friday, October 14.

Exhibit curated and designed by Dennis Grady.

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, September 30 - October 21, 2011




By His Excellency's Command… Celebrating Hanover's Quarter-millennial

Hanover 250 poster

From the Town of Hanover's original charter to Corey Ford's ruminations on why his dog likes it here, this exhibit joins the Hanover community in celebrating the town's 250th birthday. Ken Cramer, former Archivist of the College, has selected documents and images from the holdings of Rauner Special Collections Library to take us on an informative and entertaining journey through Hanover's unique history.

Exhibit curated by former Dartmouth College Archivist Ken Cramer. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady.

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, July 1- August 31, 2011




Student Bookplate poster

Student Library Service Bookplate Program

The Student Library Service Bookplate Program honors the Library's graduating student employees by inviting them to choose books for the Library's collections. Each book receives a bookplate that acknowledges the student's selection and honors his or her service to the Library. Students are eligible if they worked at least two terms in any Library department (including RWIT, The Student Center for Research, Writing and Information Technology). The Library honored nearly seventy students from the class of 2011 with selections ranging from world fiction, graphic novels, musical scores, and DVDs to children's books, inspirational works, and historical scholarship.

Exhibit design and photography: Dennis Grady – Library Education & Outreach. Many thanks to Greg Potter, Research and Information Desk Coordinator, and to the thirteen students who volunteered to participate in this exhibit.

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, June 25 - August 31, 2011




Fluxus poster

Fluxus Amongst Us: A Small Selection of Books Pertaining to the Phenomenon Known as Fluxus Art from the Collections of Baker-Berry, Sherman, Paddock, and Rauner Libraries 

This exhibit draws on the many and varied sources available in the Dartmouth College Library on the subject of Fluxus Art. Offered as a complement to the Hood Museum's current exhibit, Fluxus and the Essential Questions of Life, we hope to arose Flux-curiosity among our library patrons and encourage further encounters at the Hood Museum.

Featured in the exhibit are books by and about George Maciunas, Yoko Ono, John Cage, Dick Higgins, and Alison Knowles, among others.

Exhibit curated and designed by Dennis Grady.

For more information on the Hood Museum's exhibit go to hoodmuseum.dartmouth.edu/.

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, April 1 - July 15, 2011




Where People Get Together - The Co-op at 75 Years / Hanover Consumer Cooperative Society archive

Co-op posterIn 1936, seventeen Dartmouth College faculty families formed the Hanover Consumer Cooperative Society, Inc. To honor the Co-op's connection to the College and its 75 years of service to the Upper Valley community, an exhibit at Dartmouth College's Baker-Berry Library is on display from March through May. Featuring early Co-op documents and photographs, the exhibit presents the cooperative principles and key events in the early history of the Co-op. Some related events will take place in the exhibit hall during that time.

Exhibit curated by Dartmouth College Archivist Peter Carini and Hanover Consumer Cooperative Society, Inc. staff: Terry Appleby, General Manager, Eugenia Braasch, Board Administrator, Rosemary Fifield, Director of Education and Member Services, Allan Reetz, Communications Director. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady.

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, March 10 - June 20, 2011




The Guild of Book Workers traveling exhibition, Marking Time

Marking Time posterFor the Guild's 2009-2011 traveling exhibition, members were asked to respond to the theme "marking time" and were invited to interpret the theme as narrowly or broadly as they wished.

In this exhibit of fifty works, traditional fine leather bindings stand alongside contemporary bindings that have been dyed, collaged, or incorporated with photographs or handwriting. Texts selected to be bound are as likely to be poetry or classics as they are science fiction or hard science. The show includes work in the codex format, complex folded structures, wooden constructions, hand-held toys, and sculptural objects. Text and imagery is produced by the most ancient and the most modern mark-making methods: calligraphy, painting, woodcut, letterpress, and digital output. In exemplary work, the artist's facility with craft, structure, material and content allows each individual to create a cohesive whole.

Local binders represented in the show are: Stephanie Wolff from Vermont and Deborah Howe and Rutherford Witthus from New Hampshire.

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, November 5th, 2010 - March 20th, 2011




Winter Carnival: A Century of Dartmouth Posters

Winter Carnival poster

This exhibit accompanies the recent Friends of the Dartmouth College Library publication, Winter Carnival: A Century of Dartmouth Posters (University Press of New England, 2010), featuring full-color plates of each of the Winter Carnival posters housed in the Rauner Special Collections Library and essays by Steven Heller, Gina Barreca '79, Jay Satterfield and Peter Carini. The text for the exhibit is taken directly from the book, which is available for browsing at the Baker Main Hall information desk. The images are from Rauner Library's vast collection of photographs documenting the history of Dartmouth--a collection that is currently being digitized thanks to a generous gift of the Manton Foundation.

Order a copy of the book direct from University Press of New England.

The essays are both celebratory and critical of the posters and of the social milieu that created them. We could never hope to capture the full spirit and history of Winter Carnival in a single exhibit, so we have opted to try to illustrate the sentiments expressed in the book. We hope you will find the exhibit fun, perhaps a little unexpected, and very thought provoking.

Exhibit curated by Jay Satterfield; designed by Dennis Grady.

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, December 2, 2010 - February 28, 2011




The Book Unbound & The Book Arts at Dartmouth

The Book Unbound poster

This exhibition highlights the book and the book arts at Dartmouth in anticipation of Marking Time, the new traveling show from the Guild of Book Workers, on display in the Berry Main Street exhibition cases from November 5, 2010 through March 20, 2011.

The Book Unbound & The Book Arts at Dartmouth was curated by Stephanie Wolff and Deborah Howe, with help from Barb Sagraves, Professor Alexandra Halasz, Richard Langdell, Laura Graveline, Joe Wright, Jay Satterfield, Pat Cope, McKey Berkman, Laura Braunstein, Book Arts Program participants and CoCo 11 students. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady.

Additional Sources: The History of Making Books. New York: Scholastic Inc., 1996; Warren Chappell, A Short History of the Printed Word. Boston: Nonpareil Books, 1980; J.A. Szirmai, The Archaeology of Medieval Bookbinding. Brookfield, Vt.: Ashgate, 1999; Tsuen-Hsuin Tsien. Written on Bamboo & Silk: the Beginnings of Chinese Books & Inscriptions. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, September 7 - November 24, 2010




Everyone Is Reading: Strength in What Remains

Every One is Reading posterHanover's second annual community reading series features Tracy Kidder's new book Strength in What Remains, with its many connections both to global health issues and to the Upper Valley.

"Everyone is Reading: Strength in What Remains" will feature book-related programs designed to engage the community in discussions about the trauma of war, global health initiatives, and the power of the individual to make significant changes in society. The month-long series of events begins September 7 with a panel discussion led by clinicians detailing their experiences working at Deo's clinic in Burundi, and will end on October 13 with a discussion focusing on the psychiatric toll of war. This exhibit in the Baker-Berry Library is one of many displays, book discussions, films, and family programs taking place throughout the community. All events and programs for "Everyone is Reading: Strength in What Remains" are free and open to the public.

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, September 3 - October 31, 2010




Student Library Service Bookplate Program

Student Library Service Bookplate Program poster

The Student Library Service Bookplate Program honors the Library's graduating student employees by inviting them to choose books for the Library's collections. Each book will receive a bookplate that acknowledges the student's selection and honors his or her service to the Library. Students are eligible if they have worked at least four terms in any Library department (including RWIT, the Student Center for Research, Writing, and Information Technology). The Library is honoring over sixty students from the class of 2010, with selections ranging from world fiction in its original language, graphic novels, biographies, and DVDs to children's books, inspirational works, and historical scholarship.

This exhibit features fourteen students who have volunteered to share their thoughts with the Dartmouth community.

Exhibit design and photography by Dennis Grady.

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, June 8 - August 31, 2010

For a list of the 2010 Student Bookplate selections go to www.dartmouth.edu/~library/ris/bookplate2010.html




Anniversaries & Opportunities: Music-thinking at Dartmouth

Music-thinking poster When you hear the word "music," music-making usually comes to mind. Live performers or a recording of a performance: that's music! But one can also think about music. And there's a great deal of music research and scholarship that Dartmouth students, staff, and faculty are undertaking. This exhibit offers a sample of some of the music-thinking going on at Dartmouth.
Gustav Mahler: 1860-1911
William Schuman: 1910-1992
Congregation of the Arts: 1963-1969

Exhibit curated by Steve Swayne, Associate Professor of Music, and Pat Fisken, Head of Paddock Music Library. Designed by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach.

The four video clips created by Steve Swayne for this exhibit are available on line:
Gustav Mahler | a twelve-tone tutorial | William Schuman | The Congregation of the Arts

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, May 5 - July 30, 2010




The Fire Within: Conversations With Our Past

The Fire Within poster

In conjunction with the conference "Black Theatricality: Race and Representation in Black Literature and Culture," the Dartmouth College Library invited four students to explore the history of African American students at Dartmouth. This exhibit represents their fascinating response to the events and documents they uncovered. The students who collaborated on this exhibit are Danielle Coleman '12, Ryan Williams French '12, Hannah Giorgis '13, and Yueyue Guo '12.

 

Exhibit design by Dennis Grady.

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, March 26 - June 2, 2010

The 2010 Bildner Symposium • Black Theatricality: Race and Representation in Black Literature and Culture • April 9 and 10, 2010 • Celebrating the 40th Anniversary of African and African American Studies at Dartmouth • For a full schedule, visit www.dartmouth.edu/~lhc/events/2010/blacktheatricality.html.




Urgent Visions: Portraits of Self-Taught Artists and Their Environments - Photographs & Video by Ted Degener

Degener posterWhile the academic art world has argued ceaselessly over possible understandings of "Outsider Art," "Visionary Art," "Naïve Art," "Art Brut," in its various manifestations, photographer Ted Degener has been independently producing an illuminating collection of intimate portraits of many of the artists in question, at work in their home environments. From his home in Cornish Flat, New Hampshire, Degener has traveled throughout the U.S. and abroad, establishing personal relationships with artists working far outside the mainstream.

The Dartmouth College Library is pleased to present here a selection of Ted Degener's portraits and a few examples of the work produced by these artists. Exhibit curated and designed by Dennis Grady, Library Education and Outreach.

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, February 26 - April 30




Revealing the Human Interior: Images from De humani corporis fabrica libri septem of Andreas Vesalius

Vesalius poster

Historical anatomies tell us so much more than just what was known about the body in different times and places. They are concrete expressions of the relationship between science and art, between nature and the body, and between the physician and the patient through history. The reproductions here come from Andreas Vesalius's supremely beautiful 1543 edition of De humani corporis fabrica libri septem (Basileae: Ex officina Ionnis Oporini, 1543), one of many spectacular historical anatomies housed in the Rauner Special Collections Library. These books offer students a dissection lab for uncovering past scientific paradigms while exposing the development of western medicine. —Jay Satterfield, Special Collections Librarian

Revealing the Human Interior is part of Collections Showcase, a series of occasional exhibits that highlight Dartmouth College Library's collections.

Exhibit design by Dennis Grady.

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, January 27 - March 26




Drawings of Genocide: Darfur Through the Eyes of Its Children

Darfur posterDrawings of Genocide is a traveling exhibit produced by Article 1, a nonprofit human rights organization based in London.

"In June and July 2007, an Article 1 team member conducted a three week fact-finding mission to Eastern Chad. The aim of the mission was to assess the humanitarian, human rights and security situation in the region and to collect testimonies from Darfuri refugees and Displaced Chadians.

"While collecting testimonies from adults, women told our researcher how their children had witnessed horrendous events when their villages were being attacked. This prompted her to talk to the children. She gave the children aged 6 to 18 paper and pencils and asked them what their dreams were for the future and what their strongest memory was.

"When the children handed our researcher their drawings, she was shocked to see the details of their memories of the attacks. While a handful of children had submitted drawings of daily life in the village or in the refugee camp, the majority of the drawings described the attacks on their village by Sudanese Government forces and their allied Janjaweed militia."

 

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, January 7 - February 14




El Mundo Alrededor de Cuba - The Cuban Revolution: a Suite in Seven Parts

Cuba exhibit poster

Through a conference organized by The John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding, the Dartmouth community is invited to think critically about the 50th Anniversary of the Cuban Revolution within the context of present United States-Cuban relations.

Baker-Berry Library is participating in this event by presenting an exhibit focusing on the large collection of resources the Dartmouth College Library possesses about Cuba in particular, and Latin America in general. One aim of the exhibit is to show students how library material, collected over time, remains relevant in answering questions about our present and our future.

This exhibit narrates the events leading to the triumph of the 1959 Cuban Revolution through a small number of primary sources framed with commentaries by current scholars. The events covered took place during a short period of just two years, but their intersection with the world -- and more specifically with U.S. politics -- dramatically reshaped the last decades of the 20th century. The consequences of the Cuban Revolution are still part of today's reality. As Gerardo Canet noted in his 1949 Atlas de Cuba, a page of which serves as a recurring motif in the exhibit, "Within Cuba is the center of gravity of the Americas."

Baker-Berry Library--as do other academic libraries-- also has the responsibility of making its resources accessible to its users. In this exhibit, we have chosen a difficult topic in order to provoke reflection among students; they will, after all, have the opportunity to discover future solutions to emerging social and political conflicts and issues.

El Mundo Alrededor de Cuba: The Cuban Revolution, a Suite in Seven Parts was curated by Miguel Valladares, Latin American Studies Librarian, and Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady.

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, October 29 - December 31




Celebrating Five Years of DCAL - Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning

DCAL posterThe Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning has been promoting and supporting effective teaching at Dartmouth since 2004. This display, which celebrates DCAL's fifth anniversary, highlights its collaborations, partnerships, and the principles that guide its work. Come by Berry Main Street between July 25 and the end of fall term to learn more about one of the top teaching and learning centers in the country.

 

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, August 24 - December




One Sustainable Dartmouth

Sustainability posterA celebration of the many creative and dedicated students at Dartmouth whose efforts are defining the forefront of campus sustainability.

Global climate change is a defining sustainability challenges of our time. In the fall of 2008 Dartmouth committed to reducing campus greenhouse gas emissions by thirty percent below 2005 levels by 2030, starting with a twenty percent cut by 2015. Curbing Dartmouth's greenhouse gas emissions will require us to work together to conserve energy through individual choices; improve the energy efficiency of existing buildings; and diversify the fuel sources that power the Dartmouth campus. The six stories in the Sustainable Dartmouth exhibit highlight some of the ways in which hundreds of Dartmouth students, engaged in more than a dozen organizations, have embraced the challenge of stemming climate change by reducing our carbon footprint.

This exhibit was designed by Jermaine Johnson, Graphic Designer at Dartmouth's Office of Public Affairs. Text by Kathy Fallon Lambert '90, Dartmouth's Sustainability Manager.

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, August 1 - September 23




An Extraordinary History: James Wright at Dartmouth

James Wright posterJames Wright came to Dartmouth in 1969 as an Assistant Professor of History. During the years that followed, he became a legendary teacher, scholar, and administrator. In 1998 he was elected the 16th president of the College. In this role he has overseen significant growth in the faculty of the Arts and Sciences and increased diversity of the student population. In addition he has strengthened the College's commitment to financial aid and invested in both the academic and out-of-classroom experience through the new and renovated facilities across campus. This exhibit celebrates his legacy and many accomplishments.

This exhibit was curated and written by Susan Warner; co-curated and designed by Dennis Grady. Photography (1995-2009) and photo research by Joseph Mehling '69. Special thanks to Nariah Broadus in the President's Office; and to Patricia Cope, Sarah Hartwell, and Joshua Lascell in Rauner Special Collections for help with records location and retrieval.

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, May 16 - June 30




"In Antient and Modern Books Enroll'd": John Milton at 400

Milton posterThe Dartmouth College Library celebrates the 400th anniversary of the birth of poet and polemicist John Milton with an exhibit of materials from its collection. Curated by Laura Braunstein, Callison Lawson '09, and Alison Moe '09. Designed by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach.

 

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, April 8 - June




Seven Selected Inaugural Addresses

Inaugural Address posterPresidential Inaugural Addresses delivered by George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Woodrow Wilson, Franklin D. Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, Ronald Reagan, and Barack Obama. Curated and designed by Dennis Grady.

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, January 7 - March 27




Sons of Dartmouth - Sons of Lwala

Lwala posterThe story of Milton Ochieng' '04 and Fred Ochieng' '05, from their time as students at Dartmouth to their founding of the Ochieng' Memorial Lwala Community Health Center in their home village of Lwala, Kenya. Exhibit curated by William Young, professor emeritus in obstetrics and gynecology at Dartmouth Medical School, with thanks to Kyle Chambers '03, Fred Ochieng' '04, Caitlin Reiner '06, Joel Wickre '03, Craig Parker, and Joe Mehling '69. Designed by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach.

 

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, January 26 - March 27




Bringing Russia to Dartmouth: the Legacy of Ralph Sylvester Bartlett

Ralph Sylvester BartlettThe cultural and social upheaval which marked the early years of the Soviet Union was highly conducive to the acquisition of imperial Russian art treasures, which the Soviet government in the period between the two world wars was very eager to sell. Many American collectors took advantage of this opportunity, including Ralph Sylvester Bartlett, Dartmouth College Class of l889. This exhibit focuses on Bartlett's place among American collectors of Russian imperial art, highlighting his influence on the development of Russian studies and collections at Dartmouth, and showcasing books and objects from his large bequest to Dartmouth. The exhibit is being mounted to coincide with the symposium on Russian Art and Russian Studies in America, 1917-1945, held at the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding from Oct. 2 to Oct. 4, 2008. It was curated by Eric Esau and John DeSantis and designed by Dennis Grady.

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, October 1- December 10




Latinos and Latinas at Dartmouth: Community, Culture, and Scholarship

Latinos and Latinas at Dartmouth posterHighlighting the work of faculty, students, activists, and artists, this exhibit captures the vibrancy of Latino and Latina presence at Dartmouth College. Over the past decade, there have been over 100 Latino-themed projects from presentations by activist to student projects to exhibitions to live performances and art exhibitions. Together these works by Latinos enrich the intellectual and cultural community at Dartmouth College.

(photo: Joe Mehling)

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, October 1 - November 14




Publishers' Bindings From The Stacks of Baker-Berry Library

from Publishers' Bindings exhibit"Publishers' Bindings," the beautiful, decorative bindings that were mass-produced from the 1840s through the early 1900s, developed in response to advancements in printing technologies and the need to entice readership. Scholars have recently become interested in these bindings for their artistic mastery, cultural information, and their place in the history of book production. This exhibit displays examples from the early 19th Century through the 1940s selected from the stacks of Baker-Berry Library. Exhibit curated by Deborah Howe, designed by Dennis Grady.

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, July 10 - September 19




Barro sin Plomo - Clay Without Lead

from Barro sin Plomo exhibit This exhibit presents the story of Barro Sin Plomo, a non-profit organization helping artisans in Mexico in transitioning to lead-free glazes, addressing health, environmental, and economic issues that accompany the use of lead. The exhibit includes examples of pottery and a video that chronicles the work of an international team of experts on lead poisoning (including Dr. James Sargent, pediatrician and Dartmouth Medical School faculty member) as they travel to indigenous communities with Barro Sin Plomo on a medical fact finding mission.

Berry Main Street, Baker-Berry Library, July 1 - September 26




Dartmouth College Library Alumni Memorial Books Program Exhibit

Berry Main Street through June 15, 2008

Alumni Memorial Books posterThe Alumni Memorial Books Program exhibit illustrates the breath and depth of a program started over a half-century ago by the Class of 1914 to honor the memory of their Dartmouth classmates. All books acquired through this program recognize deceased classmates with a personalized gift plate honoring their memory. Over the years, fifty-seven Dartmouth Classes have participated in this program and have added nearly 13,000 books to the Library's collection. The exhibit features the Class of 1914, in gratitude for initiating this special program, and the Class of 1958, in honor of their 50th class reunion this June.

The display was designed by Dennis Grady and will remain on exhibit through mid-June.




Facing the North Wind: The Morton E. Wise Collection of Maurice Sendak

Baker Main Hall, Baker-Berry Library, April 1-June 30, 2008

Sendak posterThe Dartmouth College Library is honored to acquire the Morton E. Wise Collection of Maurice Sendak in recognition of the 10th anniversary of the Roth Center for Jewish Life at Dartmouth College. The collection offers innumerable opportunities for research especially when placed into the context of the other important children's book collections housed in Rauner Library. Facing the North Wind explores Sendak's work in relation to the Victorian book illustrators he points to as his key influences while investigating dominant themes of his writing.

This exhibition was curated by Patti Houghton and Jay Satterfield and designed by Dennis Grady. The materials were prepared by Deborah Howe and Lauren Telepak.




3-d Modeling and Rapid Prototyping In Architectural Design

Berry Main Street through April 18, 2008

3-d Modeling posterBaker-Berry Library currently has an exhibit of rapid prototyped models of an architectural design class using Biomimicry as an inspiration for building design. Some work was done using computer modeling and rapid prototyping to document traditional Japanese architecture. The models were produced by the Rapid Prototyper Machine at Thayer School of Engineering.

This exhibit is a direct result of the Leslie Humanities Center Fellowship in Digital Media; it is a research project of Dartmouth Senior Lecturer, Karolina Kawiaka and includes work by her students in Biomimicry Studio - Architecture 2/3- Fall 2007 from the Studio Art Department.

The objective of Senior Lecturer Karolina Kawiaka's Leslie Humanities Center Fellowship in Digital Media research project was for her to study, experience, and digitally document examples of Asian domestic and sacred architecture and gardens. She then developed a series of digitally photographed and modeled construction details and examples of traditional buildings for research and teaching purposes in architecture classes at Dartmouth College. Subsequent work by Kawiaka's students (Anna Stork '08, Patrick Hamon '08, Julian Henderson '08, and Yihan Hao '08) is included in this exhibit.

This exhibit will remain on display in Berry Library until mid-April. It is located in the Berry Main Street exhibit cases in front of the Baker-Berry reference desk. Please stop by and take a look.




Polar Connections Exhibit

Baker Main Hall and Berry Main Street through March 21, 2008

Polar Connections posterYou are welcome to celebrate and explore the Dickey Institute of Arctic Studies Exhibit titled Polar Connections: Dartmouth and the Earth's Cold Regions in Baker-Berry Library. The Baker Library Main Hall panels tell the story of Dartmouth's long and distinguished tradition of polar exploration and research. These "Polar Connections" extend from the earliest days of the College and are built upon generations of faculty and student efforts to unlock the mysteries of the cold regions. This exhibit traces the history and legacy of Dartmouth's role in Northern and Polar Studies by highlighting the accomplishments of students and faculty in the Arctic and Antarctic. The Berry Main Street exhibit, Polar Connections: Ways of Knowing, features items such as sculpture, scientific instruments, texts and video to explore varied perspectives of the polar regions.

Last Updated: 8/9/16