James N. Stanford, Ph.D.  

Associate Professor of Linguistics and Cognitive Science
Dartmouth College
E-mail: James.N.Stanford@Dartmouth.edu

Associate Editor, Asia-Pacific Language Variation

Research interests:

Sociolinguistics, Sociophonetics, Language Variation and Change, Dialect Contact, Variation in Indigenous Minority Languages, Socio-Tonetics, Sociolinguistics of Lesser Studied Languages, Sui (a Tai-Kadai minority language of China), Hmong, Tone Phonetics, Acoustic Phonetics, Endangered Languages, Indigenous Communities in North America, Ethnic Minority Languages of China, Language and Gender, Dialect Contact in Marriage, Communities of Descent, Exogamy and Linguistic Construction of Clan/Lineage Groups, Dialectology, New England English Dialects, Computational Modeling in Sociolinguistics

                                                              

Link to full CV(PDF)


PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS

Book:

Stanford, James N. & Dennis R. Preston (eds) (2009). Variation in indigenous minority languages. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: Benjamins. 519 pp.
link

Articles for Peer-Reviewed Journals:

Reddy, Sravana & James Stanford (in prep). Large-scale Twitter analysis of newly formed English clippings. For submission to American Speech.

Stanford, James N. (in prep). Inter-speaker normalization of lexical tone in connected speech: A variationist approach. For submission to Journal of Phonetics.

Baclawski, Kenneth, Nathan Severance & James Stanford (in prep). 150 years of "Canadian Raising" in New Hampshire.

Yang, Cathryn, James Stanford & Zhengyu Yang (under review). A sociotonetic study of Lalo tone change in progress. Asia Pacific Language Variation.

Stanford, James N., Nathan Severance & Kenneth Baclawski, Jr. (2014). Multiple vectors of unidirectional dialect change in Eastern New England. Language Variation and Change 26(1):103-140. link

Stanford, James N. & Yanhong Pan (2013). The sociolinguistics of exogamy: Dialect acquisition in a Zhuang village. Journal of Sociolinguistics 17(5):573-607. link

Stanford, James N. & Laurence A. Kenny (2013). Revisiting transmission and diffusion: An agent-based model of vowel chain shifts across large communities. Language Variation and Change 25(2):119-153. link

Stanford, James N. (2012). One size fits all? Dialectometry in a small clan-based indigenous society. Language Variation and Change 24(2):247-78. link

Stanford, James N., Thomas Leddy-Cecere & Kenneth Baclawski (2012). Farewell to the founders: Major dialect changes along the east-west New England border. American Speech 87(2):126-69. link
*This article was reported in The New York Times (online version/print version), The Chronicle of Higher Education, The Boston Globe, Boston NPR, and Vermont Public Radio.

Stanford, James N. & Jonathan P. Evans (2012). The influence of Mandarin Chinese on minority languages in rural southwest China: A sociolinguistic study of tones in contact. International Journal of the Sociology of Language 215:79-100. link

Stanford, James N. (2011). A 50-year comparison of regional dialect variation in the Sui language. Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society 4(2):120-43. link

Stanford, James N. (2010). Gender, generations, and nations: An experiment in Hmong American discourse and sociophonetics. Language and Communication 30(4):285-96. link

Stanford, James N. (2010). The role of marriage in linguistic contact and variation: Two Hmong dialects in Texas. Journal of Sociolinguistics 14(1):89-115. link

Stanford, James N. & Lindsay J. Whaley (2010). The sustainability of languages. International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability 6(3):111-21. link
*Reprinted as an invited chapter in Frieda Gebert & Kevin Gibson (eds) (2012) Sustaining living culture. Common Ground Publishing. 87-101.

Stanford, James N. (2009). "Eating the food of our place": Sociolinguistic loyalties in multidialectal Sui villages. Language in Society 38(3):287-309. link

Stanford, James N. (2008). Child dialect acquisition: New perspectives on parent/peer influence. Journal of Sociolinguistics 12(5):567-96. link

Stanford, James N. (2008). A sociotonetic analysis of Sui dialect contact. Language Variation and Change 20(3):409-50. link

Stanford, James N. (2007). Sui adjective reduplication as poetic morpho-phonology. Journal of East Asian Linguistics 16(2):87-111. link

Stanford, James N. (2007). Lexicon and description of Sui adjective intensifiers. Linguistic Discovery 5(1):1-27. link

Book Chapters, Proceedings, and Other Articles:

Meyerhoff, Miriam & James N. Stanford (in prep). Invited introduction chapter in Globalising sociolinguistics, Dick Smakman & Patrick Heinrich (eds). Routledge Press.

Stanford, James N. (2014). Language acquisition and language change. Invited chapter in The Routledge handbook of historical linguistics, Claire Bowern & Bethwyn Evans (eds). Routledge Press. 466-83.

Stanford, James N. (2013). Methods in tone dialectology: A sociotonetic perspective. In Alena Barysevich, Alexandra D’Arcy & David Heap (eds.), Proceedings from the Fourteenth International Conference on Methods in Dialectology, 2011. University of Bamberg Studies in Linguistics, vol. 55. Frankfurt: Peter Lang. 276-292.

Stanford, James N. (2013). Lexicalized poetry: Aesthetic patterns in the Sui adjective lexicon. Invited chapter in Jeffrey P. Williams (ed), The aesthetics of grammar: Sound and meaning in the languages of mainland Southeast Asia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 151-66.

Stanford, James N. (2013). How to uncover social variables. Invited vignette in Data collection in sociolinguistics: Methods and applications, Christine Mallinson, Becky Childs & Gerard Van Herk (eds). Routledge Press. 25-28. link

Stanford, James N. & Timothy J. Pulju (2012). Invited book review of Sociolinguistic typology: Social determinants of linguistic complexity by Peter Trudgill, Oxford University Press, 2011. Studies in Language 36(4):947-55.

Leddy-Cecere, Thomas, Kenneth Baclawski, Nacole Walker & James Stanford (2011). New England borderlands: A new investigation of the east-west dialect boundary. University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics 17.2: Selected papers from NWAV-39. 125-34. link

Stanford, James N. (2009). Clan as a sociolinguistic variable. In James Stanford & Dennis Preston (eds.), Variation in indigenous minority languages. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: Benjamins. 463-484. link

Stanford, James N. & Dennis R. Preston (2009). The lure of a distant horizon: Variation in indigenous minority languages. In James Stanford & Dennis Preston (eds.), Variation in indigenous minority languages. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: Benjamins. 1-20. link

Stanford, James N. (2006). When your mother tongue is not your mother's tongue: Linguistic reflexes of Sui exogamy. University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics 12.2: Selected Papers from NWAV-34. 217-229. link

Stanford, James N. (2004). Shuiyuzhong xingrongcide teding houzhui diaocha [Study of Sui word-specific adjective intensifiers]. Qiannan Minzu 33: 34-39. Duyun, China: Qiannan Minzu Yanjiusuo. link


Software and Web-based resources:

With Kristine Hildebrandt (in prep). SUPRA: Suprasegmental Normalization and Plotting. [online resource for sociophonetic research of tone variation]

Stanford, James (2014). Problem set: Sui adjective modifiers. Linguistic Discovery 12(1).

Stanford, James N. (2013). Sociotonetic normalization and plotting in R [computer program]. (Please email me for the R scripts.)


Conferences and other presentations:

2014
Colloquium talk to be presented for the Rice University Department of Linguistics, November 20.

With Sravana Reddy. Is the future almost here? Large-scale completely automated vowel extraction of free speech. Paper to be presented at New Ways of Analyzing Variation, October 23-26, Chicago.

With Cathryn Yang & Zhengyu Yang. An apparent-time study of tone change in progress in Lalo. Paper presented at NWAV-Asia/Pacific 3, May 1, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.

Analyzing variation and change in New England English dialects. Invited talk presented for the World Affairs Council, International Visitors Program, March 21, Southern New Hampshire University.

With Kenneth Baclawski & Nathan Severance. 146 years of "Canadian Raising" in New Hampshire. Paper presented at the American Dialect Society Annual Meeting, January 2, Minneapolis.

With Sravana Reddy & Joy Zhong. A "big data" Twitter-based study of newly formed clippings in English. Paper presented at the American Dialect Society Annual Meeting, January 4, Minneapolis.

2013
New ways of analyzing tone variation: Sociophonetic analysis of tone in Sui conversation. Paper presented at New Ways of Analyzing Variation 42, October 17-20, Pittsburgh.

With Maya Ravindranath, Nicole Chartier & Hannah Perry. New evidence of dialect shift in northern New England. Poster presented at New Ways of Analyzing Variation 42, October 17-20, Pittsburgh.

Variationist approaches to tone in Sino-Tibetan area linguistics. Plenary talk presented at the International Conference on Sino-Tibetan Languages and Linguistics (ICSTLL-46), Dartmouth College, August 7-10. PDF of the presentation.

Language acquisition and language change. Invited talk presented at the Foundations of Historical Linguistics workshop in conjunction with the Linguistic Society of America Annual Meeting, Boston, January 5.

With Nathan Severance and Kenneth Baclawski. Interrupted transmission: Eastern New England dialect features in rural central New Hampshire. Paper presented at the Linguistic Society of America Annual Meeting, Boston, January 3.

Recent dialect research in New Hampshire and Vermont. Invited talk presented for the Plymouth State University Department of Languages and Linguistics, Plymouth, New Hampshire, February 28.

2012
Transmission and diffusion in rural China and rural New England: Evidence for the "outward orientation" of the language learning faculty. Invited colloquium talk presented for the University of Pennsylvania Department of Linguistics, November 29.

Variation in indigenous minority languages: Theoretical impact and research challenges. Invited colloquium talk presented for the Swarthmore College Department of Linguistics, November 28.

With Laurence Kenny. An agent-based simulation of gender and language variation. Paper presented at New Ways of Analyzing Variation 41, Indiana University, October 26.

Invited workshop for New Ways of Analyzing Variation 41, Indiana University: "Sociolinguistic fieldwork in minority communities" (with Carmen Fought, Kalina Newmark & Nacole Walker), October 25.

With Ian Stewart. The question of density: Multi-agent modeling of field data in Sui exogamous villages. Paper presented at NWAV-ASIA/PACIFIC 2, Tokyo, Japan, National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics, August 1-4.

With Thomas Leddy-Cecere and Kenneth Baclawski. Farewell to the Founders: Dramatic changes between eastern and western New England. Paper presented at the American Dialect Society Annual Meeting, Portland, Oregon, January 6.

2011
Dialectometry and place in a clan-based indigenous society. Paper presented at New Ways of Analyzing Variation 40, Georgetown University, October 28.

With Laurence Kenny. Testing transmission and diffusion with an agent-based model. Paper presented at New Ways of Analyzing Variation 40, Georgetown University, October 28.

Methods in tone dialectology. Paper presented at Methods in Dialectology 14, University of Western Ontario, Canada, August 3.

With Yanhong Pan. Dialect acquisition and exogamy in a Zhuang minority village in southern China. Paper presented at NWAV-ASIA/PACIFIC, University of Delhi, India, February 24.

Workshop on socio-tonetics for East and Southeast Asian languages. Presented at NWAV-ASIA/PACIFIC, University of Delhi, India, February 23.

2010
Adding diversity to dialectology: A real-time study across 50 years in a clan-based indigenous Sui region in rural China. Paper presented at New Ways of Analyzing Variation 39, University of Texas-San Antonio, November 6.

Panel organizer: “Variation in less commonly studied minority languages” at New Ways of Analyzing Variation 39, University of Texas-San Antonio, November 6.

With Thomas Leddy-Cecere, Kenneth Baclawski, Nacole Walker, and Dartmouth Dialectology. New England borderlands: A new investigation of the east-west dialect boundary. Paper presented at New Ways of Analyzing Variation 39, University of Texas-San Antonio, November 4.

Variationist sociolinguistics in indigenous minority languages. Colloquium talk presented for the University of Chicago Linguistics Department, University of Chicago, May 13.

Socio-tonetic perspectives on Sui clans: "Communities of Descent." Invited talk presented for the University of Chicago Language Variation and Change Workshop, University of Chicago, May 14.

Variation in less commonly studied languages. Colloquium talk presented for the Yale University Department of Linguistics, Yale University, January 18.

With Allyson Ettinger and Mai Youa Moua. Linguistic construction of gender and generations in Hmong American communities. Paper presented for the Linguistic Society of America Annual Meeting, Baltimore, Maryland, January 10.

Variation in adjective expressives among Sui clans. Paper presented for the Linguistic Society of America Annual Meeting, Baltimore, Maryland, January 8.

2009
With Faith Nibbs. Multiple layers of hybridity in Texas: Dialects and intermarriage between Hmong supra-clan divisions. Paper presented at the 108th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Philadelphia, December 6.

The role of less commonly studied languages in theory and description: Sociolinguistic reflections. Invited talk/panelist for the Biennial Conference of the Rice Linguistics Society, Rice University, February 21.

Linguistic construction of gender in Hmong American communities. Paper presented for the Feminist Inquiry Seminar, November 3, Dartmouth College.

2008
Organizer of an invited special session on "Variation and change in less commonly studied minority languages" at New Ways of Analyzing Variation (NWAV-37), November 7, Houston.

"For better or for worse, for your dialect or for mine": Hmong Daw/Mong Leng dialect contact through marriage. Paper presented at New Ways of Analyzing Variation (NWAV-37), November 7, Houston.

Becoming R-ful: Introductory R for linguists. Workshop presented for the Rice University Linguistics Society, March 20.

Dialect contact, identity, and tone. Colloquium talk presented at Academia Sinica, March 6, Taipei, Taiwan.

With Nancy Niedzielski. New directions in sociolinguistics. Paper presented at the Joint National Taiwan University-Rice University Workshop on Linguistics, March 3, Taipei, Taiwan.

Dialect non-convergence in exogamous Sui clans. Poster presented at the Linguistic Society of America Annual Meeting, January 5, Chicago.

2007
Clan identity performed linguistically: A study of inter-clan immigration among of the Sui people of Guizhou, China. Paper presented at the 106th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association, December 2, Washington, DC.

The road less traveled: Indigenous minority languages and variationist sociolinguistics. Poster presented at New Ways of Analyzing Variation (NWAV-36), October 12, University of Pennsylvania.

Dialect contact in Sui clans. Colloquium presented for the Rice University Department of Linguistics, September 20.

Using R for vowel normalization and plotting. Workshop presented for Friends of Sociolinguistics, April 18, Michigan State University.

2006
Identity and dialect contact in Sui speech communities. Paper presented at the Michigan Linguistic Society Annual Meeting, October 28, Oakland University.

Dialect acquisition among Sui exogamous women. Paper presented at the Linguistic Society of America Summer Meeting, June 24, Michigan State University.

With Bo-Young Kwon. Child acquisition of /s/+C clusters: /s/ perceived as a degenerate syllable. Paper presented at the Linguistic Society of America Summer Meeting, June 23, Michigan State University.

2005
When your mother tongue is not your mother’s tongue: Linguistic reflexes of Sui exogamy. Paper presented at New Ways of Analyzing Variation (NWAV-34), October 22, New York University.

Poetic morpho-phonology: Rhyme, alliteration, emergence of the unmarked, and identity avoidance revealed in Sui adjective reduplication. Paper presented at the Third Workshop on Theoretical East Asian Linguistics (TEAL-3), July 22, Harvard University.

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