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Japanese Art History Courses at Dartmouth

Japanese Art History courses are offered by Professor Allen Hockley in the Department of Art History.

■ Courses Offered in 2003-2004 Academic Year
Art History 17: Sacred Art and Architecture of Japan (Fall, 2003)
This course examines Shinto and Buddhist architectural, sculptural and painting tradtions from the prehistoric to the early modern era. The emphasis will be on the relationship of these arts to the doctrinal, ritual, social and political contexts in which they were created and utilized.
 
Art History 03: Monuments of Asian Art (Fall, 2003)
This course is designed as a general introduction to the visual cultures of Asia through representative examples of architecture, sculpture, painting, and prints. The emphasis will be on India, China and Japan but it will include some examples of the art and architecture of other Asian cultures. In addition to study and analysis of the formal qualities of the art, this course will emphasize the relationship between the arts and the social, political, religious, and philosophical contexts in which they developed.
 
Art History 17: The Camera in Ninteenth-Century Asia (Winter, 2004)
This course examines the history of photography and its use by colonial governments, anthropologists, commercial photographers, tourists, and both Western and indigenous artists in nineteenth-century Asia. The material is organized and presented as a series of case studies each of which raises specific historical and critical issues students will be expected to apply to their own research.
 
COCO 15: Sacred Rituals, Arts, and Pilgrimage, East and West (Winter, 2004)
Sacred rituals, arts, and pilgrimage were integral to religious practice in both medieval Europe and Japan. While there are differences between these two cultures, the commonalities are especially striking considering that they stem from radically different belief systems (Buddhism and Shinto in Japan, Catholicism in Western Europe) and a complete lack of interaction between the two cultures. We intend to explore various cultural and artistic aspects of Japanese and Christian religious ritual practice from a comparative perspective in order to understand and explicate the similarities and differences between the two. A series of case studies juxtaposing European and Japanese examples will be organized around such themes as pilgrimage experience and narrative, construction and ideology of sacred space, devotional icons in a variety of media, and the politics of religious practice. By juxtaposing a variety of visual and textual sources, our interdisciplinary approach is designed to raise issues about the nature of religious doctrine, belief, practice, and especially culture.
 
■ Japanese Art History Courses Offered in Previous Academic Years
Art History 17: The Japanese Print Tradition

This course will survey the Japanese print tradition from its inception in the 17th century through to the early 20th century. The range of visual material will include courtesan imagery, actor prints, erotica, illustrated fiction, warrior imagery, comic prints and landscapes. Emphasis will be on the relationship between the prints and the many social, political and cultural milieux in which they circulated. This course will include applications of recent critiques and theoretical approaches from fields as diverse as sexuality and gender studies, mass culture and media studies, aesthetics of popular arts, and the sociology of consumption.

This course will be taught in conjunction with the exhibition Inside the Floating World: Japanese Prints from the Lenoir C. Wright Collection, at the Hood Museum of Art, March 25 - May 25, 2003.

 
Art History 82: Women in the Arts of Japan
This course examines representations of women in Japanese art. In particular, it will address the way images of women were used to construct gender in a variety of historical, social, political and cultural milieux. This course will survey a wide diversity of visual material including prehistoric figurines, Buddhist and Shinto sculpture, paintings, prints, photographs and modern performance art.
 
Art History 16: The Japanese Print
This course will survey the Japanese print tradition from its inception in the 17th century through to the early 20th century. The range of visual material will include courtesan imagery, actor prints, erotica, illustrated fiction, warrior imagery, comic prints and landscapes. Emphasis will be on the relationship between the prints and the many social, political and cultural milieux in which they circulated. This course will include applications of recent critiques and theoretical approaches from fields as diverse as sexuality and gender studies, mass culture and media studies, aesthetics of popular arts, and the sociology of consumption.
Art History 17: The Japanese Painting Tradition
This course provides a comprehensive survey of Japanese painting from the prehistoric to the modern era. The course will include such topics as Buddhist mandalas, Yamato-e hand scrolls, Zen ink-monochrome painting, and Ukiyo-e. The intention is to define the unique aesthetic experience offered by Japanese sacred and secular painting. It will explore, in particular, the dynamic between the traditions Japanese artists borrowed from continental Asia and the West and their own indigenous sensibilities.
 
Art History 81: Prints and Photographs of the Bakumatsu-Meiji Period
After more than two hundred years of virtual isolation, Japan opened its ports to foreigners in the mid-19th century. As Americans and Europeans took up residence in Japan, they became a new subject for Japanese woodblock print artists. At the same time, the new arrivals explored the people and culture of Japan through the lens of the camera. This seminar will focus on prints and photographs produced in this context. Specifically, it will examine the motives and attitudes behind the making of these popular arts. Recent scholarship in the fields of tourism, Orientalism, and popular culture will provide a theoretical basis for this inquiry.
 
Art History 7: Heroes and Heroines in Japanese Popular Art

Every nation has its heroes and heroines, but the way heroism is characterized in art and literature varies considerably from one culture to the next. This especially true in pre-modern Japan where the perceived difference between god and man was less distinct than in other cultures. Taking into account Japan's unique definition of heroism, one that was diverse enough to include writers, warriors, lovers, monks, and prostitutes, this course will examine the way heroes and heroines were portrayed in the popular arts. It focusses on how the popular arts struck a balance between the heroic ideal and the ethos of the people for which they were made.

 
Art History 17: Pilgrimage, Travel and Tourism in Japanese Popular Art
This course will examine the traditions of pilgrimage, tourism and travel in Japanese art. It will include both paintings and prints from the Kamakura to the Meiji periods. Anthropological and theoretical models will form the basis of our study. The course will be a combination of lectures, seminar-style discussions and student presentations.
 
Art History 61: The Arts of Japan
A survey of Japanese art from the prehistoric to the modern era. Particular emphasis will be placed on the development of Buddhist art (including Zen painting), the evolution of indigenous Yamato-e traditions, and Ukiyo-e prints and paintings.
 
Other Asian Art Courses At Dartmouth
COCO 15: Comparative Pilgrimage: The Arts and Experience of Pilgrimage in Medieval Japan and Medieval Europe
Pilgrimage as a religious and social phenomenon was integral to religious practice in both medieval Europe and Japan. While there are differences between these two pilgrimage cultures, the commonalities are especially striking considering that they stem from radically different belief systems (Buddhism and Shinto in Japan, Catholicism in Western Europe) and a complete lack of interaction between the two cultures. We intend to explore various aspects of Japanese and medieval Christian pilgrimage from a comparative perspective in order to understand and explicate the similarities and differences bewteen the two. A series of case studies juxtaposing European and Japanese examples will be organized around such themes as pilgrimage as tourism, the economic and political aspects of pilgrimage, the arts of pilgrimage, pilgrimage guidebooks, and pilgrimage narratives. The emphasis will be on working with primary visual and textual sources. This approach is designed to raise issues about the nature of religious doctrine, belief, practice, and especially culture. (Co-taught with Cecilia Gaposchkin, History Department)
 
Art History 60: The Arts of China
This course is a selective introduction to the major artistic developments in the history of Chinese art. Topics include: ritual bronzes of the Shang and Zhou periods; funerary art of the Han dynasty; Buddhist arts; and the development of various painting traditions from Han to Qing periods.

Department of Art History
Hood Museum of Art
"Screens and Scrolls" Exhibition
Sherman Art Library
Contact Professor Allen Hockley

Print by Isoda Koryûsai
(Private Collection)



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Last Updated: September 30, 2002