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Ing-Haw Cheng
Assistant Professor
Tuck School of Business
Dartmouth College
100 Tuck Hall
Hanover, NH 03755

email:
ing-haw.cheng
[at]
tuck.dartmouth.edu

Research Interests: Financial Institutions, Incentives

Curriculum Vitae | SSRN author page | Google scholar page

Working Papers:

  1. The Expected Return of Fear (October 2014)
    • Average returns to VIX futures are predictable, but not in the way you might think.

  2. Do Managers Do Good With Other People's Money? (September 2014)
    (with Harrison Hong and Kelly Shue)
    • Appendix: [online]
    • Is corporate social responsibility symptomatic of agency?

  3. Corporate Governance Spillovers (April 2011)
    • Accounting fraud is linked to poor corporate governance at competitors.

Reviews / Chapters:

  1. The Financialization of Commodity Markets (October 2014)
    (with Wei Xiong)
    • Annual Review of Financial Economics, forthcoming.
    • Commodities are now a popular asset class. How does thi

Papers:

  1. Convective Risk Flows in Commodity Futures Markets
    (with Wei Xiong and Andrei Kirilenko)
    • Review of Finance, forthcoming
    • Appendix [online]
    • Who bears risk in commodity futures markets?

  2. Yesterday's Heroes: Compensation and Risk at Financial Firms
    (with Harrison Hong and Jose Scheinkman)
    • Journal of Finance, forthcoming
    • Appendix: [online]
    • Is the cross-section of pay levels among finance firms consistent with principal-agent theory?
    • 2011 Standard Life Investments ECGI Best Finance Working Paper Prize
    • Press coverage: [wsj]

  3. Wall Street and the Housing Bubble
    (with Sahil Raina and Wei Xiong)
  4. Why Do Hedgers Trade So Much?
    (with Wei Xiong)
    • Journal of Legal Studies, forthcoming
    • Hedger position volatility outstrips output volatility. They short more when prices rise.

  5. The Hazards of Debt: Rollover Freezes, Incentives, and Bailouts [slides]
    (with Konstantin Milbradt)
    • Review of Financial Studies 2012, 25(4), 1070-1110.
    • How should debt be structured to balance debt runs and risk-shifting?

  6. The Effect of the Run-Up in the Stock Market on Labor Supply
    (
    with Eric French)
    • Economic Perspectives (Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago). Q4 2000, pp. 48-65.