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Ing-Haw Cheng
Assistant Professor
Tuck School of Business
Dartmouth College
100 Tuck Hall
Hanover, NH 03755

email:
ing-haw.cheng
[at]
tuck.dartmouth.edu

Research Interests: Financial Institutions, Incentives

Curriculum Vitae | SSRN author page | Google scholar page

Working Papers:

  1. The Financialization of Commodity Markets (October 2013)
    (with Wei Xiong)
    • A review piece prepared for the Annual Review of Financial Economics.

  2. Do Managers Do Good With Other People's Money? (March 2014)
    (with Harrison Hong and Kelly Shue)
    • Appendix: [online]
    • Is corporate social responsibility symptomatic of agency?

  3. Corporate Governance Spillovers (April 2011)
    • Accounting fraud is linked to poor corporate governance at competitors.

Papers:

  1. Convective Risk Flows in Commodity Futures Markets
    (with Wei Xiong and Andrei Kirilenko)
    • Review of Finance, forthcoming
    • Appendix [online]
    • Who bears risk in commodity futures markets?
    • NBER Working Paper #17921

  2. Yesterday's Heroes: Compensation and Risk at Financial Firms
    (with Harrison Hong and Jose Scheinkman)
    • Journal of Finance, forthcoming
    • Appendix: [online]
    • Is the cross-section of pay levels among finance firms consistent with principal-agent theory?
    • 2011 Standard Life Investments ECGI Best Finance Working Paper Prize
    • Press coverage: [wsj]

  3. Wall Street and the Housing Bubble
    (with Sahil Raina and Wei Xiong)
  4. Why Do Hedgers Trade So Much?
    (with Wei Xiong)
    • Journal of Legal Studies, forthcoming
    • Hedger position volatility outstrips output volatility. They short more when prices rise.

  5. The Hazards of Debt: Rollover Freezes, Incentives, and Bailouts [slides]
    (with Konstantin Milbradt)
    • Review of Financial Studies 2012, 25(4), 1070-1110.
    • How should debt be structured to balance debt runs and risk-shifting?

  6. The Effect of the Run-Up in the Stock Market on Labor Supply, with Eric French
    • Economic Perspectives (Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago). Q4 2000, pp. 48-65.