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German Studies
6084 Dartmouth Hall, Room 333
Hanover, New Hampshire
03755-3511
Telephone: (603) 646-2408
Fax: (603) 646-1474
 
Chair: Ellis Shookman
Ellis.Shookman@dartmouth.edu
 
Administrator: Wadeane Kunz
Wadeane.Kunz@dartmouth.edu
 

Winter 2016

Charlottenstraße

German 1. Introductory German. Taught at 9S by Petra McGillen. Introduction to written and spoken German. Intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. The textbook is the 6th edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al.


German 2. Introductory German. Taught at 9S by Yuliya Komska and at 10 by Michael McGillen. The 10 o'clock section will also use the x-hour on Thursday at 12. Continued intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. The textbook is the 6th edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al.


German 7. First Year Seminar. Taught at 10A by Petra McGillen. See Special Listings.

 

Historical Figures

German 10.02. Intermediate German Language and Culture: From God's Subjects to Global Citizens. Taught at 12 by an instructor to be announced. This course surveys history and culture of the German-speaking lands to investigate the individual's role in a changing society. Discussions will stress the uneven path of subjects, dependent on God, the ruler, or social hierarchy, towards becoming autonomous citizens. What role has philosophy, poetry, art, architecture, or music played in this emancipation process? Thinking and writing about this question will help intermediate language learners practice grammar, acquire vocabulary, and strengthen listening, speaking, and writing skills. Conducted in German.

 

poster strip

German 65. Topics in German Cultural Studies. Pre-War, Inter-War, Post-War: German Literature, 1900-1950. Taught at 2A by Ellis Shookman  . An introduction to the lives, times, and works of major German-speaking authors active in the first half of the twentieth century, e.g., Rilke, Kafka, and Trakl; Tucholsky, Brecht, Thomas Mann, Döblin, Remarque, and Fallada; Böll, Borchert, Eich, Schnurre, Kästner, and Andersch. Readings are taken from these authors' plays, poems, and prose and are complemented by audio-visual as well as vocabulary aids. Students study these literary works against the historical background of the First World War, the Weimar Republic, Hitler's seizure of power, the Second World War, and the division of Germany in 1949. They also learn about concepts such as Expressionism and Trümmerliteratur. Written and oral assignments help them improve their linguistic skills while they develop the ability to read literature ranging from early modernism to the Gruppe 47. This course counts as the culminating experience for seniors majoring in German Studies, who will meet as a group during the x-hour. Open to all classes. Conducted in German.

German 85.Independent study project. By the middle of the previous term, and after consulting with a faculty member, students submit a proposal to the department.

Last Updated: 11/25/14