Skip to main content

German Studies
6084 Dartmouth Hall, Room 333
Hanover, New Hampshire
03755-3511
Telephone: (603) 646-2408
Fax: (603) 646-1474
 
Chair: Ellis Shookman
Ellis.Shookman@dartmouth.edu
 
Administrator: Wadeane Kunz
Wadeane.Kunz@dartmouth.edu
 

Winter 2016

Charlottenstraße

German 1. Introductory German. Taught at 9S by Petra McGillen. Introduction to written and spoken German. Intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. The textbook is the 6th edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al.


German 2. Introductory German. Taught at 9S by Nick Ostrau and at 10 by Michael McGillen. The 10 o'clock section will also use the x-hour on Thursday at 12. Continued intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. The textbook is the 6th edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al.


German 7. First Year Seminar (limited to first-year students). Material Matters: A Brief History of Paper (and the Stories Written on It). Taught at 12 by Petra McGillen. The age of paper is said to be over because so much data are electronic now. Upon a closer look, however, paper is still everywhere: It is in our everyday lives (think money) and even in our language (“I have to write a term paper”). In this course, we will trace the media history of paper—from the first writing surfaces, to Gutenberg’s letterpress, to digital books—to find out how paper permeated modern culture and civilization as deeply as it did. Special attention will be on literary excerpts from the great German tradition in which paper (e.g. love letters, newspaper) takes center stage. Reading these excerpts closely, we will tease out what literature has to tell us about the cultural impact of paper at different moments in time. The history of paper, then, will give us a perspective for reflection upon our own reading and writing practices: how do we read and write? Does material matter in the creative process? See Special Listings.

 

Historical Figures

German 10.02. Intermediate German Language and Culture: From God's Subjects to Global Citizens. Taught at 12 by Nick Ostrau. This course surveys history and culture of the German-speaking lands to investigate the individual's role in a changing society. Discussions will stress the uneven path of subjects, dependent on God, the ruler, or social hierarchy, towards becoming autonomous citizens. What role has philosophy, poetry, art, architecture, or music played in this emancipation process? Thinking and writing about this question will help intermediate language learners practice grammar, acquire vocabulary, and strengthen listening, speaking, and writing skills. Conducted in German.

 

FriedrichSpitzwegKlimt

German 65. Topics in German Cultural Studies. Taught at 2A by Eric Miller on the topic "Shorter German Fiction: Novelle gegen Märchen." At the very heart of German story-telling lies the Novelle, the highly structured, consummately crafted, medium-length narrative that is often far more akin to classical drama than it is to either the European Novel or the modern Short Story.  And yet, it is not against these two dominant forms, but rather against its own evil twin, the Kunstmärchen (the literary fairy-tale), that the Novelle must wage a constant fight for survival. Works by Tieck, Eichendorff, Gotthelf, Droste-Hülshoff, Keller, Storm, Hauptmann, Hofmannsthal, Th. Mann, and Kafka. Here is a copy of the syllabus.

This course counts as the culminating experience for seniors majoring in German Studies, who will meet as a group during the x-hour. Open to all classes. Conducted in German.

 

German 85.Independent study project. By the middle of the previous term, and after consulting with a faculty member, students submit a proposal to the department.

Last Updated: 6/30/15