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German Studies
6084 Dartmouth Hall, Room 333
Hanover, New Hampshire
03755-3511
Telephone: (603) 646-2408
Fax: (603) 646-1474
 
Chair: Ellis Shookman
Ellis.Shookman@dartmouth.edu
 
Administrator: Wadeane Kunz
Wadeane.Kunz@dartmouth.edu
 

Winter 2014

Fussballer

German 1. Introductory German. Taught at 9S Ellis Shookman. Introduction to written and spoken German. Intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. The textbook is the 6th edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al.

German 2. Introductory German. Taught at 9L and at 10 by Michael McGillen. The 10 o'clock section will also use the x-hour on Thursday at 12. Continued intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. The textbook is the 6th edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al. 

German 7. First Year Seminar. Taught at 2A by Yuliya Komska. See Special Listings.

 


Medien

 

German 10.03. — Intermediate German Language and Culture: Understanding German Media  Taught at 9L by Petra McGillen. This intermediate course explores the media scene of contemporary Germany, with a focus on newspapers, TV, radio, and blogs. We will compare these media, study the kinds of language they produce, and analyze their place in contemporary German culture. Students will develop writing skills by practicing the stylistic conventions of each medium, learning to communicate effectively with different audiences. The course reviews grammar topics in detail, expands vocabulary, and strengthens listening, speaking, and writing skills. Conducted in German Dist: ART. W Cult: W

German 44. Topics in German Civilization (in English Translation). Taught 10A by Yuliya Komska. Where the Wild Things Are: The Culture of Environmentalism in Germany. Long before it became a 21st-century buzzword, "sustainability" (Nachhaltigkeit) was a term coined and propagated 19th-century German pioneers of nature conservation. For inspiration they drew not on science or political thought, but on works of art, philosophy, and literature in which nature — especially the forest — loomed large. This course will focus on high culture as a primary vehicle for Germany's ecological consciousness throughout the 19th century, the Third Reich, the Cold War, and the present. Conducted in English. By special arrangement, this course can count toward a German Studies major or minor. Dist: LIT. WCult: W.

 

wrapped Reichstag

German 65. Topics in Cultural Studies. Taught at 2A by Irene Kacandes (Students who have a conflict during that period are encouraged to contact Prof. Kacandes for a possible rescheduling of the course). "Major Transformations." This seminar will introduce students to four major issues in German culture during the 20th century: Großstadt, Gewalt und Antisemitismus; Stunde Null; Multikulturalismus; and Die Berliner Republik. Through primary readings in German and the study of visual and musical materials, students will become familiar with the methods of cultural studies and with the use of different media to explore a topic, while at the same time improving their spoken and written German. The course includes oral presentations of final paper topics. Conducted in German. Open to all classes. Here is a copy of the syllabus.  This course also counts as the culminating experience for seniors majoring in German, who will meet as a group five times over the term during the x-hour.  Dist: LIT. WCult.

German 85. Independent study project. Before the beginning of the term, and after consulting with a faculty member, students submit a proposal to the department.

 

Last Updated: 11/5/13