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German Studies
6084 Dartmouth Hall, Room 333
Hanover, New Hampshire
03755-3511
Telephone: (603) 646-2408
Fax: (603) 646-1474
 
Chair: Ellis Shookman
Ellis.Shookman@dartmouth.edu
 
Administrator: Wadeane Kunz
Wadeane.Kunz@dartmouth.edu
 

Spring 2014

Language Study Abroad (LSA): see Programs in Berlin (German 3, 5, 6). Directed by Petra McGillen


Philharmonie

German 1. Introductory German. Taught at 9S by Irene Kacandes. Introduction to written and spoken German. Intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. The textbook is the 6th edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al.

German 2. Introductory German. Taught at 10 by Konrad Kenkel. It will also use the x-hour on Thursday at 12. Continued intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. The textbook is the 6th edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al.

German 3. Intermediate German. Taught at 10 by Bruce Duncan. A continued intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. This course completes the 6th edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al. The final weeks of the term will introduce students to a close examination of Friedrich Dürrenmatt's great drama, Der Besuch der alten Dame. The completion of German 3 constitutes completion of College's language requirement. To see the syllabus, go to http://sites.dartmouth.edu/germanresources/.

German 10.02 — Intermediate German Language and Culture: From God's Subjects to Global Citizens. Taught at 10 by Irene Kacandes. This course surveys history and culture of the German-speaking lands to investigate the individual's role in a changing society. Discussions will stress the uneven path of subjects, dependent on God, the ruler, or social hierarchy, towards becoming autonomous citizens. What role have philosophy, poetry, art, architecture, or music played in this emancipation process? Thinking and writing about this question will help intermediate language learners practice grammar, acquire vocabulary, and strengthen listening, speaking, and writing skills. Conducted in German Dist: TMV. WCult: W.


Böse

German 13. "Beyond Good and Evil." Taught at 12 by Ellis Shookman and other members of the department. Borrowing its title from Nietzsche, this course examines some of the most famous and infamous figures - mythological, fictional and historical - that have profoundly shaped German identity. While exploring the lives, works, and influence of the likes of Luther, Faust, and Leni Riefenstahl, students will not only develop a greater understanding of Wagner's question "What is German?" but also learn how the answer to that question has come to epitomize notions of good and evil in general. Taught in English. WCult: CI.

German 82. Seminar: "Religion and Literature." Taught, at a time to be arranged, by Navid Kermani, the Max Kade Distinguished Visiting Professor. German literature is characterized by its strong religious references. While many other European traditions have emphasized social or psychological realism, Germans greatest poets always had a strong tendency to look upwards – be it to the heavens or into the void. This course will focus on key religious moments in German literature, understanding "religious" sometimes in a confessional sense, mainly Christian or Jewish, but also comprehensively in its transcendental alignment. We will discuss authors like Lessing, Goethe, Hölderlin, Kleist, Heine, Kafka, Celan, and Thomas Mann, as well as contemporary literature. Taught in German. Dist: LIT. WCult: W.

German 85. Independent study project. Before the beginning of the term, and after consulting with a faculty member, students submit a proposal to the department.

German 87. Honors Thesis. Arrange.

Last Updated: 1/30/14