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German Studies
6084 Dartmouth Hall, Room 333
Hanover, New Hampshire
03755-3511
Telephone: (603) 646-2408
Fax: (603) 646-1474
 
Chair: Ellis Shookman
Ellis.Shookman@dartmouth.edu
 
Administrator: Wadeane Kunz
Wadeane.Kunz@dartmouth.edu
 

Spring 2013

Gallerie des 20. Jahrhunderts

Language Study Abroad (LSA): see Programs in Berlin (German 3, 5, 6). Directed by Ellis Shookman.

German 1. Introductory German. Taught at 9S by Bruce Duncan. Introduction to written and spoken German. Intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. The textbook is the 6th edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al. To see a sample syllabus, click here.

German 2. Introductory German. Taught at 10 by Yuliya Komska. It will also use the x-hour on Thursday at 12. Continued intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. The textbook is the 6th edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al.

German 3. Intermediate German. Taught at 10 by Klaus Mladek. A continued intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. This course completes the 6th edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al. The final weeks of the term will introduce students to a close examination of a real German text - literary or filmic, depending on instructor's choice. The completion of German 3 constitutes completion of College's language requirement.

 

Loveparade

German 11. German Culture and Society in the 20th Century. Taught at 11 by Yuliya Komska. Twentieth-Century Generations. While "class" and "gender" have longer organized Western perceptions of society, "generation" has recently circulated as a category that can concern the conflict between parents and children, as well as politics and aesthetics. Writers such as Mann, Kafka, Mannheim, Jünger, Plessner, Borchert, Andersch, Enzensberger, Böll, Grass, and Senocak frame recent German generations in the context of war and social upheaval. We will also consider generational ruptures and continuities in films such as Abschied von gestern and Die Blechtrommel. Conducted in German. Open to all classes. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

 

Wolf, Goethe, Freud, Nietzsche, Riefenstahl, Marx

German 13. "Beyond Good and Evil." Taught at 10 by Gerd Gemünden and other members of the department. Borrowing its title from Nietzsche, this course examines some of the most famous and infamous figures - mythological, fictional and historical - that have profoundly shaped German identity. While exploring the lives, works, and influence of the likes of Luther, Faust, and Leni Riefenstahl, students will not only develop a greater understanding of Wagner's question "What is German?" but also learn how the answer to that question has come to epitomize notions of good and evil in general. Taught in English. Dist: LIT; WCult: CI.

Tanja Dueckers

German 82. The first session of this course is scheduled for 2A, but with the understanding that the time might be moved to accommodate all students who might wish to take it. It will be taught the Max Kade Distinguished Visiting Professor, Tanja Dückers, novelist, poet, and journalist for major German newspapers. The title is "Berlin in Literature:" Berlin is a very special city. Famous for its provokingly liberal cultural life in the 1920s, its difficult and sad role as the capital of the Third Reich, its division and consequential continuance as a double-, twin-, and frontier-city during the Cold War, its predominant role in the movements of 1968, and its new glamor after the fall of the Iron Curtain, the city has a many-faceted identity. In the first decades of the 20th century — and now again — it has been very attractive for authors to live in and to write about. This course will focus on novels, short stories, and other forms of literature (including recent poetry and blogs like Spreeblick) that deal with Berlin. We will read earlier texts like Zille's Hurengespräche and excerpts from Hans Fallada, Erich Kästner, and Alfred Döblin (Berlin Alexanderplatz); examples of contemporary Berlin literature, such as Judith Herrmann's famous short stories Sommerhaus, später, Norman Ohler's wild novel, Mitte, Katrin Askan's dark East Berlin book, Aus dem Schneider,  Annett Gröschner's observations on Berlin's oddities, Parzelle Paradies, Katja Lange-Müller's anti-glam-novel, Böse Schafe, and, in contrast, André Kubiczek's Die Guten und die Bösen on Berlin's new glamorous elite. We will also discuss texts from Berlin's large Turkish community (e.g. Hilai Sezgin's Kreuzberg novel, Mihriban pfeift auf Gott, and Yadé Kara's Selam Berlin) and dive into Russian-German writings on Berlin. Literary films and radio plays will be part of the course. Taught in German. Open to all classes. Note: Because the content of German 82 differs with each year's offering, German 82 can be taken more than once. Dist: LIT. WCult: W.

German 85. Independent study project. Before the beginning of the term, and after consulting with a faculty member, students submit a proposal to the department.

German 87. Honors Thesis. Arrange.

Last Updated: 2/18/13