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German Studies
6084 Dartmouth Hall, Room 333
Hanover, New Hampshire
03755-3511
Telephone: (603) 646-2408
Fax: (603) 646-1474
 
Chair: Ellis Shookman
Ellis.Shookman@dartmouth.edu
 
Administrator: Wadeane Kunz
Wadeane.Kunz@dartmouth.edu
 

Fall 2014

Foreign Study Program (FSP - German 29-31): see Programs in Berlin. Directed by Irene Kacandes

Zwerg 

German 1. Introductory German. Taught at 9S by Bruce Duncan and at 10 by Eric Miller. The 10 o'clock section will also use the x-hour on Thursday at 12. Introduction to written and spoken German. Intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. Note: Textbook for the course is the 6th (sixth) edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al. The syllabus for the 9S section, taught by Duncan, can be found here. The syllabus for Miller's section at 10 is here.

German 2. Introductory German. Taught at 9S by Ellis Shookman. Continued intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. Textbook for the course is the 6th (sixth) edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al.

German 3. Intermediate German. Taught at 10 by Michael McGillen. A continued intensive study of grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, and conversation. Students in this course finish the 6th (sixth) edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al. They also read short texts taken from famous examples of German prose and poetry. Passing German 3 fulfills Dartmouth's language requirement.

 

Jugend

 German 10.01. Intermediate German Language and Culture: To Be Young and German. Taught at 10A by Veronika Fuechtner. This intermediate German language and culture class investigates youth cultures in the German-speaking world from the early 19th Century through today. We will analyze different ideas of youth and their political and cultural impact in four distinct units: fairy tales and nation building in the early 19th Century, sexual awakenings and sexual research in the early 20th Century, authoritarian regimes of the mid- and late 20th Century, and youth rebellion and disaffection in post-war and post-unification Germany. This course will review more complex grammar, expand vocabulary, and strengthen listening, speaking and writing skills. Conducted in German.

 

 film posters

German 42. Topics in German Studies (in English translation). Taught at 2A by Veronika Fuechtner, cross-listed as Film Studies 42. Contemporary German Cinema. Recent German films such as The Lives of Others, Downfall, Head On or Run Lola Run have enjoyed much international success at festivals and box offices and drawn attention to a new generation of German-languages film makers. This class will explore contemporary German culture of the last twenty years through their lens. We will discuss some of the main challenges that German society is facing today: overcoming the divide between East and West integrating immigrant cultures, and coming to terms with the history of the Third Reich. In our analysis of popular mainstream movies as well as low–budget independent productions, we will also address how filmmakers today refer to their rich tradition of German cinema before reunification, e.g. the expressionist cinema of the 1920s or the New German Cinema of the 1970s. No German knowledge is required for this class – all films are available and subtitled in English. By special arrangement, this course can also be used to count toward a German Studies major or minor. Open to all Classes.

 



Goethe

 German 61. The Age of Goethe (1749-1832). Taught at 12 by Eric Miller. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was the most notable creative force of the period that bears his name, but his contemporaries included an astonishing number of other great geniuses in literature, music, philosophy, etc. Together they developed many of the concepts that define modern consciousness. Exploring "The Rise and Fall of the Humanitätsideal," the course will examine representative works by Goethe, Hoffmann, Kant, Kleist, Lessing, Mendelssohn, Schiller, and Tieck. Conducted in German. Open to all classes. The syllabus can be found at: http://www.dartmouth.edu/~german/German_61_syllabus_fall_2014.pdf.

German 85. Independent study project. By the middle of the previous term, and after consulting with a faculty member, students submit a proposal to the department.

Last Updated: 10/9/14