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German Studies
6084 Dartmouth Hall, Room 333
Hanover, New Hampshire
03755-3511
Telephone: (603) 646-2408
Fax: (603) 646-1474
 
Chair: Ellis Shookman
Ellis.Shookman@dartmouth.edu
 
Administrator: Wadeane Kunz
Wadeane.Kunz@dartmouth.edu
 

Fall 2013 Courses

 

Foreign Study Program (FSP - German 29-31): see Programs in Berlin. Directed by Gerd Gemünden.

 

Charlottenstrasse 

German 1. Introductory German. Taught at 9S by Veronika Fuechtner and at 10 by Yuliya Komska. The 10 o'clock section will also use the x-hour on Thursday at 12. Introduction to written and spoken German. Intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. Note: The textbook for the course is the 6th (sixth) edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al.

German 2. Introductory German. Taught at 9S by Ellis Shookman. Continued intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. Textbook for the course is the 6th (sixth) edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al.

German 3. Intermediate German. Taught at 10 by Bruce Duncan. A continued intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. This course completes the 6th (sixth) edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al. The final weeks of the term will introduce students to a close examination of a real German text - literary or filmic, depending on instructor's choice. You can see an almost-complete version of the syllabus at http://sites.dartmouth.edu/germanresources/. The completion of German 3 constitutes completion of College's language requirement.

 

Jugend

German 10.01. Intermediate German Language and Culture: To Be Young and German. Taught at 9L by Yuliya Komska. This intermediate German language and culture class investigates youth cultures in the German-speaking world from the early 19th Century through today. We will analyze different ideas of youth and their political and cultural impact in four distinct units: fairy tales and nation building in the early 19th Century, sexual awakenings and sexual research in the early 20th Century, authoritarian regimes of the mid- and late 20th Century, and youth rebellion and disaffection in post-war and post-unification Germany. This course will review more complex grammar, expand vocabulary, and strengthen listening, speaking and writing skills. Conducted in German. Distrib. SOC. Cul: CI

 

German 67. German Drama. TaBrecht und Uiught at 10A by Veronika Fuechtner. Drama Queens: Madness on Stage. This course analyzes how dramatic literature captured significant changes in ideas about emotions, nerves, and madness over the centuries. After a brief introduction to dramatic theory, we will read seminal works by German-language authors from the 18th through the 21st centuries, such as Schiller, Büchner, Schnitzler, Brecht, and Jelinek. The course will conclude with a public reading or performance. Conducted in German. Open to all classes. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

German 85. Independent study project. Before the beginning of the term, and after consulting with a faculty member, students submit a proposal to the department.

 

Last Updated: 8/28/13