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German Studies
6084 Dartmouth Hall, Room 333
Hanover, New Hampshire
03755-3511
Telephone: (603) 646-2408
Fax: (603) 646-1474
 
Chair: Ellis Shookman
Ellis.Shookman@dartmouth.edu
 
Administrator: Wadeane Kunz
Wadeane.Kunz@dartmouth.edu
 

Fall 2012 Courses

Foreign Study Program (FSP - German 29-31): see Programs in Berlin. Directed by Bruce Duncan.

 

Zwerg German 1. Introductory German. Taught at 9S by Petra McGillen and at 10 by Gerd Gemünden. The 10 o'clock section will also use the x-hour on Thursday at 12. Introduction to written and spoken German. Intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. Note: Textbook for the course is the 6th (sixth) edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al.

German 2. Introductory German. Taught at 10 by Konrad Kenkel. Continued intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. Textbook for the course is the 6th (sixth) edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al.

German 3. Intermediate German. Taught at 9L by Konrad Kenkel. A continued intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. This course completes the 6th (sixth) edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al. The final weeks of the term will introduce students to a close examination of a real German text - literary or filmic, depending on instructor's choice. The completion of German 3 constitutes completion of College's language requirement.

 

 


 German 9. Introduction to German Studies: From the Reformation to Reunification. Taught at 11 by Veronika Fuechtner. An introduction to German cultural history that examines social and historical developments from the age of Luther in the early sixteenth century to the unification of East and West Germany in 1990 as they are reflected in literature, art, music, and philosophy. Emphasis is placed on Germans' growing awareness of themselves as a nation and on an analysis of aesthetic and intellectual accomplishments that are representative of major periods in their history. May be elected as a prerequisite for the Foreign Study Program. Conducted in German. Dist: PHR. WCult: W.</>

 



Turkish-German Film Posters

 German 43 (Cross-listed with Comparative Literature 62): History and Theory of German Film (in English translation). Taught at 3A by Gerd Gemünden. "Arrival City: The Case of Berlin-Kreuzberg": Taking its cue from Doug Saunders' recent study, this seminar investigates patterns of immigration from Turkey to Berlin from the 1960s to the present. Focusing on the legal, economic, and social determinants of labor migration, we will study German-Turkish literature, films, and political writings to understand how the cultural identity and self-representations of Turks in Germany has shifted over the last three generations. We will also examine the issue of temporary and permanent return to the homeland. A comparative study of the arrival cities Los Angeles and Istanbul will highlight the idiosyncrasies of the Berlin scenario. Authors and filmmakers will include Zafer Senocak, Sevgi Özdamar, Aysun Bademsoy, Fatih Akin, Tefvik Baser, Thomas Arslan, Kutlug Ataman, Hussi Kutlucan, Feo Aladag, Jeanine Meerapfel, Werner Schröter, and Detlef Buck. Conducted in English. By special arrangement, this course can also be used to count toward a German Studies major or minor.

 



Goethe

 German 61. The Age of Goethe (1749-1832). Taught at 2 by Eric Miller. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was the most notable creative force of the period that bears his name, but his contemporaries included an astonishing number of other great geniuses in literature, music, philosophy, etc. Together they developed many of the concepts that define modern consciousness. Exploring "The Rise and Fall of the Humanitätsideal," the course will examine representative works by Goethe, Hoffmann, Kant, Kleist, Lessing, Mendelssohn, Schiller, and Tieck. Conducted in German. Open to all classes. Dist: LIT. WCult: W. 

German 85. Independent study project. Before the beginning of the term, and after consulting with a faculty member, students submit a proposal to the department.</>

 

Last Updated: 5/10/13