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The books published from 1976 to 1995

BIG APPLE BASEBALL
BASEBALL WIT
BEHIND THE LINES: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF DON STROCK
HOLZMAN ON HOOPS
RUNNING TOUGH
GROWING UP AT BAT: FIFTY YEARS OF LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
Primitive Baseball
Throwing Heat: the Autobiography of Nolan Ryan
150th ANNIVERSARY ALBUM OF BASEBALL
Red on Red: the Autobiography of Red Holzman
OLYMPIC CONTROVERSIES
CITY TECH: THE FIRST 40 YEARS
Baseball's Greatest Managers
JACKIE ROBINSON
THE GAMES OF THE XXIIIRD OLYMPIAD
BASEBALL'S GREATEST RECORDS, STREAKS AND FEATS
Rickey and Robinson: the Men Who broke Baseball's Color Line
Baseball’s Greatest Rivalry
SPORTS GENES WITH MYRNA FROMMER
BASKETBALL MY WAY BY NANCY LIEBERMAN WITH MYRNA FROMMER
THE SPORTS DATE BOOK

Sports Lingo

THE GREAT AMERICAN SOCCER BOOK
MARTIAL ARTS: JUDO AND KARATE
A SAILING PRIMER WITH RON WEINMANN
A BASEBALL CENTURY: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS THE NATIONAL LEAGUE
 

 

BIG APPLE BASEBALL (Taylor Publishing 1995)

In BIG APPLE BASEBALL, baseball scholar Harvey Frommer traces the game’s rich history and goes beyond the historical facts examining how New York City’s culture influenced baseball’s direction, and how baseball affected the mood of the Big Apple. These tales of Big Apple baseball lore are illustrated with over 200 black and white and full color photos, pennants, programs, posters, buttons, baseball cards, newspaper clippings and other unique pieces of baseball history.

Harvey Frommer's Big Apple Baseball: An Illustrated History from the Boroughs to the Ballparks (Taylor, $ 29.95) re-creates the history of the Yankees, Mets, New York Giants and Brooklyn Dodgers. THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH 

''Big Apple Baseball: An Illustrated History From the Boroughs to the Ballparks,'' by Harvey Frommer (Taylor, $ 29.95) is the history of the Yankees, the Mets, the New York Giants and Brooklyn Dodgers, richly told and illustrated. THE TIMES UNION, Albany, NY

What they are saying

 

 

BASEBALL WIT (Hardcover, 1992) Author: Harvey Frommer, William Gibson

ISBN: 0-68545-4290, Publisher: Interpretive Marketing Products

 

 

BEHIND THE LINES: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF DON STROCK (Pharos 1991)

Don Strock’s 17 years in the NFL place him in the top-10 list of longevity for a quarterback. During that career he has witnessed and encountered just about everything that is a part of professional football. In Behind the Lines he talks about it all from his unique point of view.

"Behind the Lines is a riveting read. There’s so much inside stuff here -- coaches, players and fans." DAN MARINO

"This is an honest, frank look inside the world of pro football. You won’t put Behind the Lines down." LARRY KING

"Riveting reading. There’s so much inside stuff here. If you want a book that will tell you things about football that you never knew, Behind the Lines is for you." DAN MARINO

"Filled with all the anecdotes one would expect of ribaldry, camaraderie, professional jealousies, games won and lost. Strock also offers intelligent, informed opinions on such topics as instant replay, labor relations, steroid abuse, and female reporters in the locker room." BOOKLIST

"Innumerable insights, anecdotes, and inside angles all of which will be of great interest to the passionate football fan." LIBRARY JOURNAL

 

 

HOLZMAN ON HOOPS (Taylor Publishing 1991)

A follow-up to Red on Red in which Holzman offers anecdotes from his life in basketball, from the early years to the present.

The man who led the Knicks through two World Championships tells it like it was. Funny stories, behind-the-scenes details, fascinating statistics, challenging quizzes, intimate portraits of greats like Wilt Chamberlain, Walt Frazier and Julius Erving, and a liberal helping of hoops history - you name it, it's here.

 

 

 

RUNNING TOUGH (Doubleday 1989)

Offers a detailed inside look at the NFL and its most colorful players, including a no-holds-barred look at "America's Team, " the Dallas Cowboys. Dorsett also covers drug and steroid use among players, media stereotyping, the excesses of college recruiting, and his controversial trade to the Denver Broncos.

"Tony Dorsett, the No. 2 rusher in NFL history, says he faced racism every day when he played for the Dallas Cowboys and that America's Team was cliquish and racially polarized.

In excerpts from his book, ''Running Tough,'' which appear in the Aug. 19 issue of TV Guide, Dorsett said Dallas fans in 1977 wanted to see black football players kept in ''their place.''

''It was the first time in my life that I was exposed, on a daily basis, to the Southern drawl, the slow pace of life, the conservatism and the overt racism,'' the running back said in the book he wrote with Harvey Frommer. Dorsett, now a running back for the Denver Broncos, suffered a career-threatening knee injury Aug. 3.

''In Dallas, in the late 1970s, white people didn't seem to have a problem calling you a nigger to your face,'' he said. ''It wasn't that I hadn't been exposed to racial prejudice before, but where I came from (Pennsylvania), if they took a chance and called you nigger, they'd be 50 yards away and running.''

Dorsett got into some celebrated scraps in Dallas. During his first week with the team in 1977 he was charged with two counts of simple assault after what he said was a racially charged fracas at a disco.

The charges were later dropped but Dorsett said memories linger of that incident and others.

''As a young black guy in a fancy car around Dallas, I was stopped by the police more times than I care to remember,'' said the former Heisman Trophy winner from Pitt. ''I'd be in an elevator with a bunch of white people, and they'd move away from me and give me hostile looks.''

He said former quarterback Roger Staubach was ''one of the few people who truly seemed to understand what it was like for me then.''

Dorsett said the Cowboys were racially divided and the team's medical staff was not always honest with him. He said the trainers once told him his ribs were bruised, when he later found they were broken.

''Another problem on the Cowboys was cliques,'' he said. ''There was a lack of intermingling between black and white guys on the Cowboys. It was strange for me to see it. All through high school and at the University of Pittsburgh, all the black and white guys hung around together. We partied like friends. We liked each other.''

Dorsett said he held out for 21 days before signing for the 1985 season after learning Randy White and ''a bunch of other white guys were being set up for many years to come by the Cowboys.

''They were getting their after-football lives taken care of by new contracts with package deals that contained annuities. I felt that was treatment I was also entitled to, and I was determined to get it.''

He eventually settled on a ''20-year annuity worth $6 million and some other good things." United Press International, Tony Dorsett says racism marred Cowboy days, August 14, 1989

"America's Team was one wrought with racial problems and race-oriented cliques in the late 1970s, former Dallas Cowboys running back Tony Dorsett says in his new book.

"It was the first time in my life that I was exposed, on a daily basis, to the Southern drawl, the slow pace of life, the conservatism, and the overt racism," Dorsett said in the book, "Running Tough," which he wrote with Harvey Frommer.

Excerpts from the book are to appear in the Aug. 19 issue of TV Guide. Dorsett, the National Football League's No. 2 career rusher, is currently rehabilitating a knee injury suffered in the Denver Broncos' training camp.

In the book, Dorsett said Dallas fans in 1977 wanted to see black football players kept in "their place."

"In Dallas, in the late 1970s, white people didn't seem to have a problem calling you names to your face," he said. "It wasn't that I hadn't been exposed to racial prejudice before, but where I came from, if they took a chance and called you names, they'd be 50 yards away and running."

Dorsett, a native of western Pennsylvania, said former quarterback Roger Staubach was "one of the few people who truly seemed to understand what it was like for me then." Bergen Record, DORSETT: PAST COWBOYS TEAMS FULL OF RACISM, August 15, 1989

EXCERPT: RUNNING TOUGH
 
"Dorsett on the Cowboys: 'It Was Not a Free Atmosphere'"

There were a lot of people who came through Dallas in my time there who were afraid of Tom Landry.

The winning record, the aura he had about him, those things made him into a living legend. He was a strict disciplinarian, and he could be intimidating.

His lack of warmth also kept people away. Once we were both in a hurry to get out of Washington and back to Dallas, and we shared a limo going to the airport. He wouldn't do any talking. Then, at the airport while we were waiting to get on the plane, I tried to engage him in conversation. Nothing much happened. His mind was on other things, not on talking. When we got on the plane, I tried once again to talk with him, but he didn't talk back. The most I got back from him were short, straight-to-the-point answers. There was no small talk. So I finally just gave up and went to sleep. There were times when Tom could make you feel great. And there were other times when he would make you think you were nothing. Tom was capable of little verbal jabs, coldness, long looks at you. There was never any swearing on his part, no four-letter words. It was all controlled.

Tom's way with words, his bearing, carried a mystique all its own. There were all kinds of stories associated with it. One that I heard a few times concerned a rainy morning Tom drove to the team practice field. When Tom pulled over to his reserved parking space, he saw it was occupied by a car owned by a rookie linebacker, Steve Kiner. Soaking wet but controlled, Tom walked into our locker room. He looked Kiner in the eye. "I admire a man with courage," Tom said.

Walt Garrison was asked once if Tom Landry ever smiled. "How the hell should I know?" Walt answered. "I only played for Dallas nine years."

Punctuality was one of Tom Landry's big things. There was never any give and take at all as far as lateness was concerned; no one ever got the benefit of the doubt. If there was a rainstorm or a snowstorm or some problem with traffic -- that didn't matter. If you didn't get to a meeting on time, you'd get fined, regardless of your reason. The next time you were late the fine doubled, then tripled, then quadrupled. Flexibility, human consideration, were never part of the deal.

In my second season with the team I experienced that inflexibility first-hand. My mom and dad had come down to Dallas to watch me play in a game scheduled against the Philadelphia Eagles on Oct. 21, 1978. We had a Saturday practice and I overslept.

"Don't you think you ought to call someone?" my dad asked. "Won't you get into trouble?"

"I don't have anyone to call," I told him. "It's no big deal anyway. It's just a Saturday practice, a little dress rehearsal. We don't do anything much but walk through things."

The next day I got to the stadium and was told that Coach Landry wanted to see me.

"What happened yesterday?" he asked.

"I overslept. Sorry about that."

"That's too bad," he said. "You're not going to start this game and you probably won't even play."

"But, Coach," I protested, really taken aback. "I have to play. My family has come down here. They've come thousands of miles to see me play. This is what my life is all about, my family." Tom just looked at me.

"You won't play," he said softly.

I was so angry. My eyes filled with water. I was hurt real bad. That was Tom and the total control he had. There was no way you could go over his head to (Cowboys President) Tex Schramm or anybody else. Tom Landry ran that team, period.

I'll never forget that incident. It showed me just how unfeeling Tom Landry could be.

A kind of fetish about punctuality was part of Tom's atmosphere of control, and some silly rules and regulations were also part of the picture. There was a strict rule that no one could wear a baseball cap at meetings. It wasn't like we were sitting in some auditorium where everyone was dressed in black tie. But if guys came to meetings with caps on their heads and didn't take them off, they'd get fined. That was ridiculous. Wearing a cap doesn't stop anybody from concentrating.

The control mentality of the Dallas system was everywhere. On the road Dallas management would treat us like boys by putting security on the floors of the hotels that we stayed in. No one was allowed on the floor to visit you -- they couldn't even get up to one of those floors. If your mother wanted to visit you, she wasn't allowed up. Players had to go down to the lobby to visit with any friend or relative who came calling. Man, that was always an uncomfortable situation, being in the lobby with all those people, those fans, just hanging around. Guys complained, but it was just another example of the Cowboy way of life. It was not a free atmosphere.

Dan Reeves, my present coach [in Denver], is the kind of coach you respect and want to work hard for. He's dedicated to winning, but at the same time he tells jokes and treats players like men. It seems funny that Landry was the teacher and Reeves was his student. But lately the student had more success.

One of the ways Dan is a lot different from Tom Landry as a coach is that he gives his players much more freedom. At the training camp it is possible to leave on weekends or even during the week and drive back into the city. Your family is allowed to come up to the training camp and eat dinner with you and spend a night there. Beer is served on Wednesday nights. All of these things break the monotony, the grueling routine of an NFL training camp. All the players appreciate things like that.

Even so I still consider Tom Landry the best football mind around. You had to respect the man as far as preparing a team for a game was concerned. He covered everything. Tom had such a feel for the game that he could predict what would happen out on the field all the time.

With the Dallas Cowboys on a downslide there were all of these attacks on Tom Landry and what he'd done with the team. I still think he's a great coach. His record speaks for itself -- all the things he's accomplished. But in the center of his ways he hadn't changed in years. If he had changed it would have helped the Cowboys.

When everybody else is changing, you have to change too if you want to still be up with the best. You have to change, go with the flow, or else you get lost in the shuffle.

When Buddy Ryan was with Chicago and brought in what he called the Bear defense -- that was a change. Everybody's been changing throughout the league. But you haven't seen Dallas changing that much. All over the NFL teams started developing big offensive lines. The Cowboys, previously the innovators, in this case were the followers. It took the Cowboys and Tom Landry a few years before they started to do what others had already done.

People asked, "What had Tom Landry brought to football lately?" Sure, years back he brought in the multiple offense, the shotgun, and back in my rookie year he would put a back or a tight end in motion and trap a man over center. That was a good innovation and worked well. But when people asked what Tom Landry had done lately, it was a legitimate question.

Tom Landry had been in Dallas for 29 years and was one of the most visible personalities in the National Football League. He was almost like a permanent fixture. At least we thought he was. It seemed to everyone that Tom would never be fired, would never be dealt with the way he was. But I guess his dismissal just goes to show that no one is really secure in this business. Those are just the hard and cold facts about it. Anyone can be fired.

I've seen a lot of players treated the way Tom was -- without any warning, without any respect. But you just felt that would never happen to Tom because he was a class guy who meant so much to the National Football League for so many years. But it happened.

I wish Tom nothing but the best. I had my disputes and misunderstandings with him, but I've always admired him.

I felt for Tom Landry, the way things ended, and I hope one day our paths will cross again.

From the book "Running Tough: Memoirs of a Football Maverick" By Tony Dorsett and Harvey Frommer. Copyright 1989 by Tony Dorsett and Harvey Frommer. To be published by Doubleday in October, 1989.
LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE

 

 

 

GROWING UP AT BAT: FIFTY YEARS OF LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL (Pharos 1989)

Kirkus Review

http://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/non-fiction/harvey-frommer-7/growing-up-at-bat-50-years-of-little-league-bas/

The only officially sanctioned book to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of Little League Baseball, GROWING UP AT BAT tells the story of the growth of this uniquely American phenomenon into an international institution. Hundreds of anecdotes and some very special features make the book come alive.

"Touches all the bases." KIRKUS

"The definitive volume" MILWAUKEE SENTINEL

"A winner" INSIDE BOOKS

"A nicely done history" INDIANAPOLIS NEWS

"A fine chronicle of the impact of Little League." GRIT

"A celebration and a memento, a history and a montage of memories, this book will have a prominent place on my bookshelf." A. BARTLETT GIAMATTI

"A treasure house of information pertaining to Little League Baseball and its history." HOUSTON HOME JOURNAL

"A wonderful read for those who have always been involved in the sport and those who have always been curious about it." YANKEES MAGAZINE

"Memories re-lived in this neat book." SENIOR TIMES

"Everything you need to know." UNION LEADER

"Baseball fans and concerned parents will enjoy." DESERT SUN

-The Little League playing field is two-thirds the size of a regulation diamond, with 60 feet between bases and 46 feet from the pitcher's mound to home plate.

-Little League games have six innings instead of the regulation nine.

-Little League founder Carl Stotz approached 56 merchants in the Williamsport area before Lycoming Dairy agreed to sponsor a team for the 1939 season. The other two original teams were sponsored by Lundy Lumber and Jumbo Pretzel. -Some early Little League games featured 10 players on a side, with four outfielders, so more youngsters could play.

-The sex barrier finally fell June 30, 1974, when Little League Baseball cited the ''changing social climate'' in announcing that girls would be permitted to play on its teams.

-The Hammonton, N.J., Little League, established in 1947, became the first league outside Pennsylvania. In 1951, a league in British Columbia, Canada, became the first outside the United States.

-In 1949, Hammonton, N.J., became the first non-Pennsylvania team to win the World Series.

-Monterrey, Mexico, became the first foreign team to win the World Series with a 4-0 victory over La Mesa, Calif., in the 1957 championship. Monterrey won the title again in 1958, becoming the first back-to-back World Series champion.

-In 1967, West Tokyo, Japan, became the first team from the Far East to win the World Series. The Far East representative has won 17 of the succeeding 21 championships. Thirteen were won by teams from Taiwan.

-The World Series championship game was first televised by ABC's ''Wide World of Sports'' in 1963. The first live broadcast occurred in 1985.

-Dugout, Little League's official mascot, was created for the league by Disney Studios.

-Poland will field four leagues in 1989, becoming the first Warsaw Pact nation to join the Little League community.

-In addition to the 2 million youngsters who participate in Little League each year, the program includes 750,000 adult volunteers. Some facts about Little League Baseball, drawn from ''Growing Up at Bat: 50 Years of Little League Baseball,'' by Harvey Frommer - -United Press International

Growing Up at Bat by Harvey Frommer  is the official history of this American institution, whose alumni include Nolan Ryan and Bruce Springsteen. Recollections by noted alumni are interesting. THE WASHINGTON POST

 

 

Primitive Baseball (Atheneum l988)

"Frommer has loaded his book like a corked bat with baseball history." PLAYBOY

"Fascinating." PHILADELPHIA NEWS

"Lots of interesting details." COURIER-GAZETTE (Rockland, ME)

"A brisk tour of the origins of America's most popular sport." MILWAUKEE JOURNAL

"Captures the spirit of the game." PUBLISHER'S WEEKLY

"A trivia buff's delight and a baseball fan's treat." YANKEES MAGAZINE

"Interesting perspective on a by-gone era." SPORTS BOOK DIGEST

"Chronicle of baseball in its first quarter century, plus profiles of its first stars." DALLAS MORNING NEWS

"Entertaining history...an impressive collection." SACRAMENTO BEE

"Handy reference that belongs in the fan's library." AUSTIN-AMERICAN STATESMAN

"Jammed with arcane information covering the game's roots, early corporate history, principal players, teams and parks. " KIRKUS

 

 

 

Read more about this book @ epinions.com

Throwing Heat: the Autobiography of Nolan Ryan (Doubleday l988, Avon l989)

Catalog Copy

Worthy Mentions

The co-author, Harvey Frommer, who wrote "New York City Baseball," deserves credit for retaining Mr. Ryan's country boy style and self-absorbed perspective, allowing us to see both the pitcher and the person. ... Building Ideas

This book was written by Nolan Ryan after the 1987 season and accordingly gives plenty of space to his playing time with the Astros. Most other books about Ryan seem to treat his time in Houston as merely a pit stop between California and Texas, despite Ryan spending more seasons with Houston than any other team. OK, it's a personal peeve of mine. Anyway, I'd like to give a glowing recommendation to this book, but cannot. Most of the Ryan's observations involve himself and his pursuit of different statistical goals (wins, strikeouts, no-hitters). A sample excerpt: "My third pitch to Danny was a real good curveball. He swung and missed. I had wanted to be the first one to attain 4,000 strikeouts from the time I broke the Walter Johnson record, and it felt real good." There's plenty more where that came from, in addition to much high praise of Ryan from other players. If you are a Nolan Ryan fan, get this book. Otherwise, check it out at the library.

"A home run by the greatest strikeout artist ever." ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

"One of the better baseball books of recent years." PARADE

"The narrative quality of a novel. Frommer deserves credit for retaining Mr. Ryan's country boy style and self-absorbed perspective allowing us to see both the pitcher and the person." NEW YORK TIMES

"Easily the best baseball bio, if not the hottest on the market." NEW YORK POST

"Straightforward, no nonsense autobiography." PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

"A delight for any fan." ERIE TIMES (PA.)

"It's Frommer again - good reading." TORRANCE DAILY BREEZE (CA)

"Appealing autobiography, a wonderful read." YANKEES MAGAZINE

"Well worth the money." UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL

"Is as good reading as Ryan throwing." WEST COAST REVIEW OF BOOKS

"Interesting in a tantalizing sort of way." WINDSOR STAR

"Rich in baseball lore - a fascinating account." HOUSTON CHRONICLE

"Best of all it speaks in Ryan's own voice." HOUSTON POST

"A home run by the greatest strikeout artist ever." ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

"If you are looking for an autobiography that is not controversial then ''Throwing Heat: The Autobiography of Nolan Ryan,'' by Ryan and Harvey Frommer is well worth the money. The book by the Houston Astros' Ryan tells the story of one of the game's greatest pitchers in a straightforward fashion." USA TODAY

"There are some publishers who would not put a book out unless it's controversial,'' said David Gernert, Doubleday's associate publisher. ''When I thought about the Ryan book, I felt it was a book about a man who does something better than any man alive. I think people want to read about legends, that's what Nolan Ryan is.'' UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL

 

 

150th ANNIVERSARY ALBUM OF BASEBALL (Franklin Watts 1988)

Baseball has been America’s game for over 15 decades. It is a sport played and watched by millions around the world throughout their lives. Baseball is Opening Day and the seventh game of the World Series, the man in blue – the umpire, and the seventh inning stretch. It is heroes and marker moments and history waiting to be made. Acclaimed sports historian Harvey Frommer has a handle on all of this in this words and pictures book.

 

 

Red on Red: the Autobiography of Red Holzman (Bantam l987, paperback l988)

The career of the player, scout, coach and general manager who is synonymous with pro basketball for many New Yorkers and who coached the Knicks to their only two NBA Championships.

"The entertaining account of a man's life in the sports that made him a legend. Oh, what a time. What a team!" NEW YORK TIMES

"Younger fans may not know his name, but the older set will enjoy the chance to reminisce about one of the game's greatest teams." BOOKLIST

"A terrific book." BILL MAZUR, WPIX-TV

"This low key, straightforward memoir is appealing offering many insights into basketball." PUBLISHER'S WEEKLY

"A book I heartily recommend." MIKE LUPICA, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

"Poignant, colorful, dramatic, verve-filled, a wonderful read." YANKEES MAGAZINE

"Exciting, humorous, insightful, intriguing." DODGER BLUE

"Basketball nostalgia served straight up." KIRKUS REVIEWS

"Self-effacing, honest and humorous." BILL BRADLEY, U.S. SENATOR

"Perfect for basketball fans." TIMES TRIBUNE (Palo Alto, CA)

"This book is broken into 3 "books". The first tells of his life from college up to when he took over as coach of the New York Knicks. The 2nd book tells of his first 10 years as coach of the Knicks. The last book goes through 1987, the year the book was written. 

The first book describes his years as a guard on the Rochester Royals and tells of their great teams and classic rivalry with the Minneapolis Lakers. He also tells of his brief coaching stints at Milwaukee and Atlanta. He also tells of his time coaching in the Caribbean Islands and his years in the Knicks organization as a scout and an assistant coach. 

Then he goes into his years as coach, and how he got the players to buy into his rigid defensive and team-oriented offensive strategies. You learn all about "See the ball" and "Hit the open man," phrases you will run across in any book about the Knick teams from that era. He talks about trying to find the right chemistry (which resulted in trading Walt Bellamy for Dave DeBusschere). He also tells about acquiring Jerry Lucas and Earl Monroe and he also tells of who the Knicks were also looking into getting and why they couldn't. 

He also goes through the disappointing years of the late 1970s and the players on those teams, who he still speaks highly of. He tells of being "promoted" into a figure-head job of little importance and what he's done since leaving basketball. It's a pretty good book if you are interested in that time period. It is one of the few books I have read that gives a personal perspective of playing in the pre-shot clock era, though." TRIPOD

"When they want to feel good, fans of the New York Knickerbockers remember the years 1968 to 1975. While Knick teams of the 80's play bad basketball to a lot of empty seats, great Knick teams of not so long ago treated sellout Madison Square Garden crowds to the playoffs every year. Hoop fans everywhere know the 1969-70 and 1972-73 Knick championship teams. Walt Frazier, Willis Reed, Dave DeBusschere, Bill Bradley and Jerry Lucas are in the Hall of Fame. So is their coach Red Holzman, who taught them teamwork and showed them how to win. ''Red on Red,'' written by Mr. Holzman and Harvey Frommer, a journalist and sports historian, is the entertaining account of a man's life in the sport that made him a legend. Born on the Lower East Side in 1920, Mr. Holzman was an all-American player at City College and turned pro with the old Rochester Royals. He joined the Knicks as chief scout and assistant coach when he was 37 and scouted such future stars as Frazier, Reed, Bradley and Cazzie Russell.

When Mr. Holzman became the Knicks' head coach in 1967, he was ready: ''There's a time for everything in a man's life, and this, I knew, was my time, my time to do something special. And I knew I could.'' The glory years unfolded. Although ardent fans will want to read about every memorable play and moment, Mr. Holzman recounts only some - including, of course, the inspiring story of Willis Reed, the injured captain, limping heroically through the final game of the 1970 championship series. A keen observer of today's game, the coach recalls his winning players with respect and affection. Oh, what a time. What a team!" NEW YORK TIMES, January 31, 1988,

"Red on Red, by Red Holzman and Harvey Frommer, published in 1987 by Bantam Books. The career of the player, scout, coach and general manager who is synonymous with pro basketball for many New Yorkers and who coached the Knicks to their only two NBA Championships.

Holzman on Hoops, by Red Holzman and Harvey Frommer, published in 1991 by Taylor Publishing. A follow-up to Red on Red in which Holzman offers anecdotes from his life in basketball, from the early years to the present." A LIST OF MUST-READS FOR ANY NBA FAN, NBA.Com

 

 

 

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OLYMPIC CONTROVERSIES (Franklin Watts 1987)

Beginning with the first Modern Olympics, Harvey Frommer discusses thoroughly and in chronological order the various controversies that have affected the summer and winter Olympics. Highlights from the book include the early debate over women participating in the games, the revoking of Jim Thorpe’s medals, the Berlin Olympics, a combative water polo match between Hungary and the Soviet Union, the Black Power salute by two American athletes, the Arab terrorists attack on Israeli culminating in their deaths, a controversial US-Russian basketball game, and the boycotts of the Olympics by the US and Russia.

"An excellent addition to your collection. This interesting and enjoyable book will be enjoyed by all age groups." BOOK REPORT

 

 

 

CITY TECH: THE FIRST 40 YEARS (City Tech Press 1986)

By interviewing the chief participants in its founding and development and by thoroughly exploring the College's archives and other records, Harvey Frommer has written a chronicle that is entertaining, enlightening and inspiring. (From Book Jacket)

 

 

 

Baseball's Greatest Managers (Franklin Watts l985)

"Leo ('The Lip') Durocher, Wilbert ('Uncle Robbie') Robinson, and John('Little Napoleon') McGraw are among the 21 managers singled out by Frommer as the best of all time. . . . {Using} anecdotes and interviews, Frommer explores their lives and careers." LIBRARY JOURNAL

"Prolific sports author Harvey Frommer offers this gem of a book for all baseball history and trivia buffs and plain old fans of all ages. . . . Never dry or superficial, this book is full of personal anecdotes and quotes that give insight into the lives of the men who walk the professional tightrope between genius and scapegoat." VOICE of YOUTH ADVOCATES

"An excellent, enjoyable study." RED BARBER

"The manager of a major league baseball team cannot, as a rule, run, hit or field. Most prominent managers were, in fact, some of the worst players in major league history. Walter Alston, for instance, came to bat once in the major leagues and struck out. Nonetheless, Harvey Frommer builds a case for the claim that a manager's handling of player talent and game strategy does indeed win or lose ball games.

In 1901, Pittsburgh manager Fred Clarke replaced popular shortstop Fred Ely (who complained of a pain in his finger) with a young outfielder named Honus Wagner. The converted outfielder went on to win eight batting titles and set numerous fielding records at shortstop -- while becoming the catalyst for three consecutive pennant winners. In 1929, Philadelphia manager Connie Mack surprised everyone by selecting 35-year-old journeyman Howard Ehmke, who had appeared in only 11 games all season, to open the World Series against the Cubs. Ehmke responded with a 13-strikeout, complete-game victory.

In 1949, New York Giant manager Leo Durocher traded four players to get the young double-play tandem of Eddie Stanky and Alvin Dark, key players on the Giant's 1951 championship team. A rookie center fielder on that same 1951 team asked Durocher to be returned to the minors after a slow start, but Durocher told Willie Mays: "You're my center fielder and that's all there is to that." Frommer makes it clear that the best managers consistently put themselves in a position to win.

Frommer's list of 21 pilots includes managers from every era of the game -- from Cap Anson to Dick Williams (who has fielded titlists with the Red Sox, Athletics, Expos and Padres). Frommer chooses not to list some very successful managers such as Sparky Anderson and Tommy Lasorda in order to include some fine managers burdened with bad personnel for most of their careers -- such as Connie Mack, Wilbert Robinson and Bucky Harris. Ironically, some of the best managers have lost their jobs for failing to do the one thing that a manager cannot do -- win the game between the foul lines.

Although baseball has reigned as perhaps the quintessential American sport for more than 100 years, Frommer notes that the art and skill of managing baseball teams remains poorly understood and undervalued -- even by the baseball establishment. Such successful managers as Williams, Bill McKechnie and Casey Stengel had to move from team to team in their careers. Former and now current Yankee manager Billy Martin has returned to the helm of George Steinbrenner's ballclub for the fourth time; Martin has been fired seven times in his managerial career, a testimonial of sorts. Frommer's book, a treasure-trove of managerial lore, entertainingly focuses long-overdue attention on the greatest managers and is a welcome addition to baseball literature." LOS ANGELES TIMES

"A fine book and a valuable addition to baseball literature which we will make frequent use of." BASEBALL HALL OF FAME

"Rich collection, a fascinating study." JOE GERGEN, NEWSDAY

"One of the most prolific and energetic baseball authors offers many insights into managers. I enjoyed the book immensely." MILTON RICHMAN, UNITED PRESS

"Interesting addition to baseball lore." LIBRARY JOURNAL

"A good balance between old-timers & contemporaries." PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

"An absorbing look." BANNER, NASHVILLE, TN

"One of the great baseball books." DAILY NEWS, BOWLING GREEN, KY

"Solid, historical consistency throughout." PITTSBURGH PRESS

"Quick reading. An enjoyable trot through baseball's colorful past." TUSCON STAR

"A perceptive collection full of reading pleasure." YANKEES MAGAZINE

"Baseball as history." DAILY PRESS, NEWPORT NEWS, VA

"Certain to entertain baseball fans." ASBURY PARK (NJ) PRESS

"One of the most prolific and energetic baseball authors offers many insights into managers. I enjoyed the book immensely." MILTON RICHMAN, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL

"The manager of a major league baseball team cannot, as a rule, run, hit or field. Most prominent managers were, in fact, some of the worst players in major league history. Walter Alston, for instance, came to bat once in the major leagues and struck out. Nonetheless, Harvey Frommer builds a case for the claim that a manager's handling of player talent and game strategy does indeed win or lose ball games.

In 1901, Pittsburgh manager Fred Clarke replaced popular shortstop Fred Ely (who complained of a pain in his finger) with a young outfielder named Honus Wagner. The converted outfielder went on to win eight batting titles and set numerous fielding records at shortstop -- while becoming the catalyst for three consecutive pennant winners. In 1929, Philadelphia manager Connie Mack surprised everyone by selecting 35-year-old journeyman Howard Ehmke, who had appeared in only 11 games all season, to open the World Series against the Cubs. Ehmke responded with a 13-strikeout, complete-game victory.

In 1949, New York Giant manager Leo Durocher traded four players to get the young double-play tandem of Eddie Stanky and Alvin Dark, key players on the Giant's 1951 championship team. A rookie center fielder on that same 1951 team asked Durocher to be returned to the minors after a slow start, but Durocher told Willie Mays: "You're my center fielder and that's all there is to that." Frommer makes it clear that the best managers consistently put themselves in a position to win.

Frommer's list of 21 pilots includes managers from every era of the game -- from Cap Anson to Dick Williams (who has fielded titlists with the Red Sox, Athletics, Expos and Padres). Frommer chooses not to list some very successful managers such as Sparky Anderson and Tommy Lasorda in order to include some fine managers burdened with bad personnel for most of their careers -- such as Connie Mack, Wilbert Robinson and Bucky Harris. Ironically, some of the best managers have lost their jobs for failing to do the one thing that a manager cannot do -- win the game between the foul lines.

Although baseball has reigned as perhaps the quintessential American sport for more than 100 years, Frommer notes that the art and skill of managing baseball teams remains poorly understood and undervalued -- even by the baseball establishment. Such successful managers as Williams, Bill McKechnie and Casey Stengel had to move from team to team in their careers. Former and now current Yankee manager Billy Martin has returned to the helm of George Steinbrenner's ballclub for the fourth time; Martin has been fired seven times in his managerial career, a testimonial of sorts. Frommer's book, a treasure-trove of managerial lore, entertainingly focuses long-overdue attention on the greatest managers and is a welcome addition to baseball literature." Blume is a frequent contributer to The LOS ANGELES TIMES

 

 

 

JACKIE ROBINSON (Franklin Watts 1984)

National Baseball Hall of Fame, Selected Bibliography: Jackie Robinson

Harvey Frommer has written a sensitive commentary on Jackie Robinson's life, from his childhood in Pasadena, California , through his years as a a sports hero, to his later involvement in politics and the civil rights movement. Dr. Frommer has drawn upon interviews with Robinson's family, friends, and fellow ball players to tell the story of a courageous man who triumphed over bigotry and personal tragedy to take his place in the hearts of millions of Americans.

"He came to play, to excel. Even though hurt, exhausted, discouraged, threatened, he played. He played when everything mattered, and he performed with the same intense desire when nothing mattered at all. In this way, he was a model of sustained drive, of consistent excellence, of dedication to team, to profession, to prevailing."

"This is a good one – readable and honest. Frommer writes honestly. For such a brief biography, Frommer covers a lot of ground and does it in a frank and interesting manner." LIBRARY JOURNAL

"Goes beyond the standard litany of sports achievements to analyze Robinson’s struggles. A satisfying look into the career of a talented, sensitive man." BOOKLIST

 

 

THE GAMES OF THE XXIIIRD OLYMPIAD, LOS ANGELES WITH MYRNA FROMMER (International Sports Publications 1984)



Officially sanctioned by the International Olympic Committee, published under license from the Los Angeles Olympic Committee, this 300-page book with full color lavish photographs throughout is a panorama of the LA Games. From the Opening to the Closing ceremonies, from Archery through Fencing through Judo through Weightlifting through Tennis through the Modern Pentathlon, "The Games of the XXIIIRD Olympiad" belongs on the bookshelf of every sports fan.

"Harvey and Myrna Frommer, perhaps the only husband-and-wife team specializing in writing about sports, have been selected as a result of a nationwide search to be editors of the "Official Licensed Book of the XXIII Olympiad, Los Angeles, Summer 1984. "The excitement is building. In a little more than six weeks, the eyes of the world will be focused on the 1984 Games of the XXIII Olympiad, Los Angeles. This year's Olympic Games will be the biggest Olympic event of all time. More than 8,000 athletes from more than 140 countries are expected to compete for medals in 23 sports and more than 350 events. By the end of August, however, the Olympics will have come and gone.

The Games of the XXIII Olympiad, Los Angeles, 1984 will be recorded for future generations in the official licensed commemorative book. The book will consist of 288 pages featuring the work of some of the world's best photographers and awarded-winning writers. In addition the book will feature a forward by author-humorist George Plimpton.

The book will be editorialized by Myrna and Harvey Frommer, a husband-and-wife team specializing in writing about sports. Harvey Frommer has written 17 books, focused on such diverse sports as judo, karate, baseball, sailing, basketball and soccer. He is the author of the best-selling "A Baseball Century," and the critically acclaimed "New York City Baseball," "Rickey and Robinson," and "Sports Lingo," to name just a few. The Frommers co-authored three sports books including "Basketball My Way -- Nancy Lieberman."

Dr. Harvey Frommers' most recent articles include: "Baseball's Golfer's" for Golf Digest Magazine; "The Singing Voice of the New York Yankees -- Robert Merrill" for Yankees Magazine.

Harvey Frommer was recently honored by the Chancellor of the City University of New York in an annual Salute to Scholars "who have brought distinction to themselves and to their university during the past year."

The Frommers have made more than 200 guest appearances on radio and TV programs, lectures at libraries, community programs and college lecture series.

"My wife and I look forward with much enthusiasm to work as editors of the commemorative volume on the Olympics," said Dr. Harvey Frommer. "It promises to be a great adventure for me and others involved in it. The Olympic Book will be the crown jewel of our sports publishing career."

PR Newswire, PHILADELPHIA, July 6 /PRN/

tomfolio.com

elephantbooks.com

curiobooks.com
 

 

 

BASEBALL'S GREATEST RECORDS, STREAKS AND FEATS (Atheneum 1983)

This is much more than a collection of statistics. Popular baseball author Harvey Frommer re-creates the legendary statistical achievements in the game’s history, using contemporary accounts of the events, historical perspectives on their durability and interviews with the record setters themselves.

"…is a book that will be read and enjoyed over and over again." MCCORMICK MESSENGER

"Frommer is at it again. The popular baseball has come up with his fifth book on the sport and it is a dandy. Above all, it offers another chance to relive some of the magic moments of baseball and meet again many of the heroes of the game." CHATANOOGA TIMES, October 12, 1987

 

 

Rickey and Robinson: the Men Who broke Baseball's Color Line (Macmillan l982)

National Baseball Hall of Fame, Selected Bibliography: Rickey and Robinson

"My great respect, gratitude and warmth for your scholarly work and to preserving the legacy of my dear husband." RACHEL ROBINSON

"A vivid account of the two as genuine American heroes." WASHINGTON POST

"Touching." NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

"One of the best...brutally honest with no punches pulled." AMSTERDAM NEWS

"A fine and sympathetic biography." LIBRARY JOURNAL

"A worthy effort." MILWAUKEE JOURNAL

"Interesting, exciting book." JERSEY JOURNAL

"Thorough research, a vivid account." CHICAGO TRIBUNE

"Covers all the bases, briskly paced." SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER-CHRONICLE

"Frommer's analysis of Rickey's motives sets book apart...raises all the right questions in interesting ways." BOOKLIST

"An unusual and deeply moving book." PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

"Whether you lived the period or merely heard about it, you'll enjoy it even more if you read Frommer's book." ST LOUIS POST DISPATCH

"A celebration, a nostalgic account." EBONY

"What makes the book worth the price of admission is how he integrated the two lives of the principals." TOLEDO BLADE

"Pleasant, upbeat look at this unusual pair-up." KIRKUS

dailybruin.ucla.edu, isbn.nu

 

 

    

    

Baseball’s Greatest Rivalry (Atheneum l982, l984)

"The summer game at its best, recalled in all its agony and ecstasy." BOSTON GLOBE. 

"A fine addition to our collection, an excellent book." BASEBALL HALL OF FAME

"An excellent book." SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS NEWS

"The prolific Frommer takes a potentially routine topic and molds it into a thoroughly, enjoyable book." BOOKLIST

"Replete with all the drama and excitement that has marked this rivalry." ST LOUIS GLOBE DEMOCRAT

"Frommer is argumentative and colorful, able to sketch characters and relate stories with ease." CHOICE

"Fine reading and new insights, fascinating book." YANKEES MAGAZINE 

"Memorable moments and Frommer’s reliable reportage." KIRKUS REVIEWS

"The great moments are re-created bringing the tone of the rivalry alive." CHATTANOOGA TIMES

"Next best thing to attending a Yanks-BoSox game." JACKSONVILLE TIMES UNION

"A book for every Red Sox fan who ever said 'I love New York too - - it’s the Yankees I hate.'" FENWAY TRUMPET

"What the damn Yankees have done to the Red Sox over the years should be against the law, as we see in Baseball’s Greatest Rivalry." BOSTON LEDGER

 

 

 

SPORTS GENES WITH MYRNA FROMMER (Ace 1982)

Covering a variety of sports from baseball to horse racing, football to hockey, SPORTS GENES profiles and offers a vivid history of the many interesting sports relatives throughout history. Fathers, son, brothers - -an inside look at family stars of the sports world.

 

 

BASKETBALL MY WAY BY NANCY LIEBERMAN WITH MYRNA FROMMER (Scribner's 1982)

Whether you’re a coach or a beginner, intermediate or advanced player, Basketball My Way will help improve your game. The techniques outlined are proven ones - - skills that helped to create a basketball star who is making sports history.

"A quality work, presentation clear and simple" SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE

"Solid" BOOKLIST

"Basketball My Way, by Nancy Lieberman is valuable reading for young
basketball players for two reasons. First Lieberman has mastered the physical
skills of the game of basketball and is therefore well-equipped to teach others
to do so. Secondly, Lieberman uses her own experiences to discuss the emotional
challenges which still face a young woman who wants to succeed in the game.

As a member of the 1976 Women's Olympic team while still in high school
and the first round draft choice of the Dallas Diamonds of the Women's
Professional Basketball Association, Lieberman is often described as the
nation's #1 female player. Having learned the game as a youngster on the
playgrounds of New York City, Lieberman knew what it felt like to be excluded
from a game because she was a woman. Lieberman knew what it felt like to
collide with a male opponent twice her size. But Lieberman also knew she wanted
to play basketball.

Lieberman maps out for the reader what could be their road to basketball
stardom. She is a well rounded teacher stressing not only the fundamentals of
the game, but conditioning and nutrition. "If you take care of your body and
your mind, they'll take care of you," she writes. Also important to Lieberman
is a positive mental attitude; "the difference between a winner and a loser is
many times a matter of mind," she believes.

Lieberman leaves out few aspects of the full court game as she breaks it
down into specific skills. She instructs her readers in the basics of shooting,
passing and rebounding illustrating these skills in photographs of herself and
her Diamonds teammates.

Chapters are also devoted to the more sophisticated skills of off the
ball defense, fast break defense, running the fast break and setting and
defending against the screen.

Coaches will find great teaching value in the attention Lieberman pays to
skill development. Specific skill movements are broken down and explained.
Lieberman offers her own tips as well as individual and team drills which will
help players master these skills." GENDERWATCH

 

 

THE SPORTS DATE BOOK (Ace 1981)

Sports history, listed by date, for the entire calendar year. Dates are the markers of our lives. They record births, deaths, anniversaries, dramatic events, good times and bad moments. For those of us who are sports fans, dates have a special significance. For the world of sports, though always changing, is anchored in the record book, and the records are all locked into time.

"Frommer has found some really interesting and amusing facts. Should the browser turn first to see his or her birthday, there will be a reward for no day of the year is left out." KLIATT

 

 

Sports Lingo (Atheneum l980, l983)

"A marvelous piece of work." RED BARBER

"An alphabetically arranged assemblage just right for fans of all sports." BOOKLIST

"A handy reference work" LOS ANGELES TIMES

"An excellent reference source and comprehensive collection." UNITED PRESS

"One of those volumes to place in a handy pile, open for a browse. Part of the fun is the exploring and discovering." MONTREAL STAR

"Complete, informative." KLIATT

"An organized dictionary for those who know a lot about sports and for those who wish to know more." EL PASO REVIEWS

"Makes the meaning of the terms clear to non-experts. Very enlightening." SCHENECTADY GAZETTE

"Organized, handy and informative." KFAC, Los Angeles

''Putting mustard on it'' and ''plum ball'' are not just gustatory descriptions; they also apply to the world of sports. The first deals with a baseball pitcher who is throwing hard, the other is a racquetball term for a cinch shot. Each is included in the recently published ''Sports Lingo: A Dictionary of the Language of Sports,'' compiled by Harvey Frommer. Browsing through it, one comes across a surprising number of terms borrowed from the dinner table.

Baseball leads all other sports, with such fare as this: Baltimore chop, beanball, can of corn (a lazy, high fly ball), cup of coffee (a very brief stay as a player in the major leagues), forkball, grapefruit league, jam the hitter, nightcap, pepper game and slab (the pitcher's rubber). And, of course, for home base it's plate, or dish.

In golf, a most wholesome sport, there are greens. In basketball, there's a dunk. In football, a ball carrier hit by defenders both fore and aft is said to be ''sandwiched;'' a poor kick is a ''shank,'' and there is a particular formation called a ''wishbone.''

One entire sport has the name of a food: squash. The most distasteful term of all comes from hockey. At certain moments, a defensive player will take it upon himself to eat the puck. It's a funny game." SCOUTING; Sporting Fare: Food for Thought By Ira Berkow in The New York Times March 25, 1983

"QUIZ

HEY, BATTER, BATTER

Who knew baseball and the food world had so much in common? Test your command of baseball lingo by matching up these baseball terms that also could allude to food.

-- 1. Baltimore chop

-- 2. Batter

-- 3. Bean

-- 4. Bunt

-- 5. Can of corn

-- 6. Cup of coffee

-- 7. Cut

-- 8. Dig in

-- 9. Drive in

-- 10. Forkball

-- 11. Grapefruit league

-- 12. Hot stove league

-- 13. Jam the hitter

-- 14. Nightcap

-- 15. Pepper game

-- 16. Rhubarb

-- 17. Slice the ball

-- 18. Whiff

A. Pregame warm-up action where a player taps the ball to teammates who field the ball and flip it back to him.

B. To tap, but not swing, at a ball to get it to roll just a bit onto the playing field.

C. The spring-training schedule of the major-league teams in Florida.

D. A hard-smashed ball near home plate that bounces high in the air and gives the runner a chance to beat the throw to first base.

E. A batter's swing.

F. To swing at a pitch and miss it. To strike out.

G. To strike a batter in the head with a pitched ball.

H. The act of a batter getting firmer footing in the batter's box by using the spikes on his shoes to loosen the ground. Metaphorically, a situation where a batter bears down in his concentration against a pitcher.

I. A lazy, high fly ball.

J. A ball thrown by a pitcher who grips it with his index and middle fingers spread apart; this pitch dips downward as it approaches the plate.

K. To pitch a ball close to a hitter so as not to allow him to extend his arms when he swings and to keep him off balance.

L. The player who is up at bat.

M. To bat a run in, to cause a run to score.

N. To hit the ball so that, for example, it veers left when batted by a left-handed hitter, or vice-versa.

O. Designation for wintertime baseball doings and gossip.

P. A very brief time as a player in the major leagues.

Q. The second game of a doubleheader.

R. A passionate difference of opinion that produces an extended argument on the playing field.

Answers: 1. D, 2. L, 3. G, 4. B, 5. I, 6. P, 7. E, 8. H, 9. M,

10. J, 11. C, 12. O, 13. K, 14. Q, 15. A, 16. R, 17. N, 18. F"

Source: "Sports Lingo: A Dictionary of the Language of Sports" by Harvey Frommer, (Atheneum, 1979, $9.95); ENRIQUE RODRIGUEZ/erodriguez@journalsentinel.com

Copyright 2002 Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, October 16, 2002

 

 

 

THE GREAT AMERICAN SOCCER BOOK (Atheneum 1980)

Three years in the making, the result of hundreds of interviews, this data-filled, insightful and highly organized book presents the definitive story of soccer. It will appeal to spectators, participants, to those who know a great deal about soccer and those who want to know more.

"A complete book indeed, it is a terrific book. It is perhaps the one book on soccer that is the complete one." WEVD NYC Radio

 

 

 

MARTIAL ARTS: JUDO AND KARATE (Atheneum 1978)

Through the use of many illustrations the author presents the basic movements of the two arts. He discusses the histories, legends, rankings, etiquette and terms peculiar to each.

"A concise, well-done book." SALT LAKE CITY BOOK REVIEW

"A good starting point for the beginner – recommended." NASSAU LIBRARY SYSTEM

 

 

A SAILING PRIMER WITH RON WEINMANN (Atheneum 1978)

Any person interested in sailing is sure to find this book useful and enjoyable, particularly as a tool for beginning sailors. The text is generously illustrated with black-and-white

"Simply written, explains clearly all basic sailing terms." BOYS LIFE

"A complete guide to sailing." PENNSYLVANIA LIBRARY SYSTEM

 

 

A BASEBALL CENTURY: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS THE NATIONAL LEAGUE (Macmillan 1976)

Once every hundred years a sports book of these dimensions becomes possible. Here, in 256 remarkable pages, is a panorama of baseball, a birthday celebration of the National League.

"An excellent book. One of the most lavishly illustrated baseball books we’ve ever seen. All in all, this is one gift book - - it’s hard to resist." DALLAS NEWS 

"This picture filled large format volume is the National League’s own celebration of its 100-year history. Contains in depth profiles of each National League team plus stories of outstanding personalities, great match-ups, the all-star performers in every decade and the evolution of equipment and playing fields.

This historical salute, durably and handsomely made, affectionately but honestly written, rich in the evaluations, statistics and trivia peculiar to  baseball -  is in every respect worthy of the game." New Yorker Magazine

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