Vaccines

Photo of Speaker Hoyt Speaker Hoyts Book
Kendall L.Hoyt, PhD Long Shot
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Dartmouth Medical School
Fellow at the International Security Program at Harvard
Vaccines for National Defense
by Kendall Hoyt
(Harvard University Press 2012).

Bio: Kendall Hoyt is a Fellow at the International Security Program at Harvard University. She is also an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at Dartmouth Medical School. She studies U.S. biodefense policy and R&D strategy. She is currently writing a book on the history of military-industrial relations in vaccine innovation and biodefense research.

Kendall Hoyt was a Research Fellow with the International Security Program at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government where she studies international biosecurity strategy and biodefense research policy. She is currently writing a book that examines the interplay of national security concerns and commercial interests in the history of vaccine innovation. Most recently, she has investigated business-government relations surrounding efforts to stem the proliferation of biological weapons without squelching the innovative capacity of the international biopharmaceutical industry.

Kendall is a term member at the Council of Foreign Relations and serves as an adviser to a number of governmental institutions on biodefense research policy. She is also working with the New England Center for Emergency Preparedness to develop an emergency pharmaceutical cache plan for Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont. She has worked for the Executive Session for Domestic Preparedness at Harvard University, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, McKinsey and Company, and the Center for the Management of Innovation and Technology at the National University of Singapore.

http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/people/faculty/kendall-hoyt/

Long Shot: Vaccines for National Defense book cover Long Shot: Vaccines for National Defense by Kendall Hoyt (Harvard University Press 2012). Troubled that the rate of vaccination innovation has been falling despite the rise of biotechnology, Hoyt, a Thayer lecturer and Dartmouth Medical School professor, argues that “as man-made biological threats proliferate and new diseases continue to emerge naturally, we urgently need to understand the conditions that foster timely innovation.” Her book examines the history of—and today’s obstacles to—vaccine development. - See more at: http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/magazine/publications-faculty-books-winter-2012/#sthash.j98jEsoO.dpuf