Evelyn Gick

Visiting Assistant Professor
Dartmouth College
MALS
6092 Wentworth
Hanover, NH 03755

Telephone: (603) 646-3592
Fax: (603) 646-3590




email: evelyn.gick@dartmouth.edu

 

 


My research covers cognitive economics, in particular in F.A. Hayek's work "The Sensory Order." I am currently working on a book project that explains his "Theory of Morality" based on his cognitive writings
(to appear in the book series “Routledge Foundations of the Market Economy”, Series Editor: Mario Rizzo).
Other research interests cover cultural evolution, business ethics, globalization with reference to gender, the economics of fashion, capitalism, and the emergence of modern institutions.

I am the recepient and first winner of the 2001 Hayek Prize, awarded by the F.A. Hayek Gesellschaft.

CV

 

Selected Publications and Work in Progress:

The Role of Dispositions in Hayek's Cognitive Theory. forthcoming in: William N. Butos (ed.) The Social
Science of The Sensory Order: Advances in Austrian Economics, Vol. 11, Emerald Press. [ Article ]

Morality and Cognition: A Hayekian Perspective. Paper presented to the Colloquium on Market Institutions and Economic Processes, NYU Economics Department, September 17, 2007.

Morality and Cognition: A Hayekian Perspective. Paper presented to the Workshop in Philosophy, Poli-
tics and Economics, George Mason University, February 2007. [ Article ]

Hayek and Modern Evolutionary Theory, in: Koppl, R. (ed.) Evolutionary Psychology and Economic
Theory, Advances in Austrian Economics (2004), vol. 7: 79-100 (co-authored with Paul Rubin).[ Article ]

Cognitive Theory and Moral Behavior: The Contribution of F. A. Hayek to Business Ethics, in:
Journal of Business Ethics (2003) 45: 149-165 [ Article ]

F.A. Hayek's Theory of Mind and Theory of Cultural Evolution Revisited: Toward an Integrated Perspective, in: Mind and Society (2001) 3,2: 149-162 [ Article ] (co-authored)

The Evolution of Morality: F. A. v. Hayek's Perspective on Social Capital, in: Habisch, H. (ed.)
Corporate Citizenship and Social Capital (co-authored), Berlin: Logos (2001).

Hayek's Theory of Cultural Evolution Revisited: Rules, Morality and the Sensory Order, Discussion paper #01/00, Series B (Economics), University of Jena, Department of Economics and Business Administra-
tion (co-authored). [ Article ]

   
 

Teaching:

  • History of Economic Thought (Econ 358-01, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics)
      This is a course on economic ideas. It embraces ancient and medieval contributions as well as present-
      day approaches. One focus of the course is on economists and philosophers that have influenced the path of economics
      and the way we define economics as a science today. We set their ideas against the background of ethics, globalization, free trade, and the role of government. I have taught this course in Fall 2009. .

     

  • Women in Globalization (Econ 269-01, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics)
      The goal of this course is to look at globalization issues from the uncommon perspective of gender.
      All over the world, women break down the traditional roles and are a powerful voice in defining political realities and human rights. I have taught this course in Fall 2009.

     

  • MALS 360: The Political Culture and Morality of Market Societies (Dartmouth MALS)
      This course is based on the ethics of market systems, with their roots originating in the economics of Adam
      Smith. The course focuses on the development of morality and how it is be achieved in different societal settings
      over the past centuries. It culminates in the moral problems that globalization poses.
      I have taught this course in Fall 2008.

     

  • Why The Devil Wears Prada: An Economic View of Fashion (Dartmouth WGST)
      Women have a dynamic relationship to clothes and fashion. In the light of behavioral economics this topic is now becoming of interest to economists. The result is a fascinating new research agenda that gradually replaces purely sociological viewpoints, which are becoming obsolete since the 1960s. Such a view has been neglected in standard economic theory. The course aims in particular at incorporating cognitive views.
      I have taught this course in Fall 2007 and Summer 2008.

     

  • Economics 71: History of Economic Thought (Dartmouth Economics)
      This is a course on economic ideas. It embraces ancient and medieval contributions as well as present-
      day approaches. One focus of the course is on the contribution of economists and philosophers and on
      their influence of the path that economics has taken as a science today. Seen against the background of
      ethics, globalization, free trade, and the role of government, this course aims at offering an understan-
      ding of economic thought.
      The web page to this course can be found at  www.dartmouth.edu/~econ71 .

     

  • Economics 1: The Price System (Dartmouth Economics)
      This is an introductory course of microeconomics covering consumer choice, the behavior of profit-maximizing firms, competitive markets, monopolies, oligopolies and monopolistic competition.
      Applications focus on externalities, government policies, taxes, and environmental economics.
      The last course page is for Fall 2006. You can find it at www.dartmouth.edu/~econ01eg .