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Teaching Science Seminar

Since 2006, the Teaching Science Seminar has provided a venue for science faculty to discuss issues concerning teaching and learning in the sciences. Teaching Science Seminar meets twice per term for 90 minutes over lunch at the Teaching Center in DCAL. Meetings address various issues and topics related to teaching science, and are lead by either Dartmouth faculty or invited speakers.

Upcoming Seminar Dates

Thursday, October 15th from 12-1:30PM

Terry McGlynn, a professor at Cal State - Dominguez Hills, will discuss strategies for broadening recruitment of students from groups underrepresented in science into graduate programs at research universities. In particular, he will discuss ways to reach out to outstanding students from regional comprehensive colleges and universities.

Friday, November 13th from 12-1:30PM

Some Past Session Topics

Student Learning in Science Classrooms

Michelle Smith, Assistant Professor in the School of Biology and Ecology at the University of Maine and member of the Maine Center for Research in STEM Education, received PhD training as a lab scientist. Her research now focuses on how different classroom approaches affect student learning in science and her recent work focuses on the origins of conceptual misunderstandings, and what can be done to overcome these misunderstandings.

Flipped Science Classrooms

Kevin Shea, a Professor of Chemistry at Smith College, will talk about his use of pre-class videos and second-generation audience response technologies in his Organic Chemistry classes. Professor Shea will also share how students respond to these classroom experiments, and how these approaches affect student learning.

Team-Based Learning

Have you heard about team-based learning (TBL) but wonder how it might work in your classroom? Ann Clark (Psychological and Brain Sciences) will lead a discussion about how she has implemented TBL in her classroom, student reaction to this format and lessons learned.

Teaching the "Nature of Science" in Introductory Science Courses

National scientific organizations have called for students to be taught the nature of science, yet education research has shown that introductory science courses are largely ineffective in conveying much beyond a naïve conceptualization of the nature of science. Join Dr. David Kraemer (Education and Psychology & Brain Sciences) to discuss why students have difficulty learning abstract concepts such as the nature of science and what education and cognitive research reveals about techniques for developing a conceptual understanding of the nature of science.

If you have ideas for future session topics, contact TSS Faculty Fellow, Tom Jack.

Last Updated: 10/1/15