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Course Design Series

This series is designed to support faculty in preparing to teach new courses or revise existing courses.  It consists of four 2-hour-sessions that can be tailored to accommodate participant needs and provides a process and structure to prepare a course for delivery. While the sessions are designed to lead participants through an integrated course design process sequentially, individual sessions address discrete course development steps and can be attended individually.  We recommend, however, that participants attend as many of the sessions as possible to receive maximum benefit from the program.

Session I. Beginning with the end in mind: What do you want your students to know and what do you want them to be able to do with what they know? This session introduces the integrated course design process and gets participants immediately engaged with the first step of writing student-centered learning outcomes.

Session II. Assessment and feedback that demonstrates student learning: How will you know they know? Working on feedback and assessment early in the course development process makes it easier to develop effective teaching and learning activities. In this session, we will discuss principles of good feedback and assessment, the setting of criteria and standards, and various assessment techniques that generate feedback for students on their learning, as well as for you on teaching and course design.

Session III. Designing significant learning experiences: What in-class and out-of-class activities lead to student achievement of learning objectives? How will you conduct class so students have opportunities to practice thinking and performing in ways you value? We will discuss the differences between passive and active learning, and ways to assist students in regulating their own learning.

Session IV. Putting it all together: Assessing your course design and writing the syllabus.  We will check alignment of learning outcomes, assessment and learning activities and assembling these pieces into a coherent syllabus that communicates the course to students.

Some comments from past participants:

  • I left with some very concrete ideas, some creative confusion (this is good!) and really like the worksheet [provided]. I hope to work through this for each of the components of [my] course.
  • The group was a good size, it is very helpful to exchange ideas with others – large enough for good dialog, small enough that each of us had a chance to get feedback.
  • Really appreciated the structure but also the significant flexibility we had to go deeper into an area of interest.

For more information on the series please contact Prudence Merton at prudence.merton@dartmouth.edu.

Last Updated: 3/23/12