Jan 312015
 

Let me be the first one to tell all you Prospective and Early Decision students that college is HARDER than high school. No, but seriously, it’s hard. You will no longer be able to do your spanish homework in the hallways on your way to class or skip studying for exam because you think you paid enough attention in class. NEWSFLASH: everyone studies here and most people actually enjoy it and go above and beyond what is required of a course (they’re still considered overachievers, so no worries there).

Dartmouth, for me and for a lot of students who are here, was definitely a transition. On top of going to class for 9-11 hours a week, you have extracurriculars, homework, personal time, meals, friends, and distractions around every corner. My biggest advice is to establish good study habits and stay on top of your reading from the get-go.

If you don’t know how to or want help figuring your life out, Dartmouth has lots of organizations, people and departments that were built to help you succeed! So let’s run down some of the more important ones!

1. Academic Skills Center (ASC)- This place provides everything and anything you need to succeed academically. The Academic Skills Center is home to the Tutor Clearinghouse which offers a variety of study help. From conversation partners in whatever language you’re learning to private tutors for any subject, they do their best to match you up with someone who is best going to help you achieve your goals. The ASC also offers one-on-one academic coaching with Dartmouth Staff to help you create a personalized list of goals, a study plan, and regular check-ins. Or if you’re more into group studying, bigger introduction courses (like Economics 1 or Math 3) will have study groups set up by professors through the Tutor Clearinghouse so that students can sign up. All students hired by the ASC have earned high grades in their classes or are fluent in the language they are teaching. And on top of that, if you’re on financial aid, your costs will be covered!

2. You Professors- Have a question on something covered in class? Who better to explain it to you than the person who is an expert on the subject and will be testing you! All Dartmouth professors hold open office hours on a weekly basis. You can go and ask questions or just go and introduce yourself! They are all really excited to meet their students and very helpful.

3. RWIT Institute for Writing and Rhetoric – RWIT is the best resource for anyone who needs help with a paper! From scientific reports to creative writing to research papers, these students have been trained to help your organize and

The best advice I can give is to reserve your appointment as far in advance as you can.

4. Undergraduate Deans Office – Upon enrolling, based on where you live, you will be assigned a Dean. He/She is there to provide you with guidance and support in all aspects. They’re like your high school guidance counselor! I’ve gone in to talk about what classes I should take and how to solve relationship problems. They make for great listeners and are a good place to get questions asked and problems solved. They’re also the person who can give you certain permissions to move around your schedule! The Deans office also has DOSCs (Deans Office Student Consults). Hand-picked by the Deans, these seniors are trained to assist you when the Deans aren’t around. So when you find yourself freaking out about what classes to take at 10 pm with a midnight deadline, you can pop on right over to wherever they’re set up in the library and ask them for help.

5. Your Undergraduate Advisor (UGA)- the upperclassman who lives on your floor. UGAs are a great resource and have chosen to offer themselves as such. They are trained on a weekly basis and kept up to date on what residents should know. Even if they don’t personally know the answer, chances are they know where to refer you to!

Being in college is going to be challenging in many ways. Luckily, Dartmouth College really cares about making sure you transition well and continue to do well academically! You have all of these wonderful resources at your disposal. My biggest suggestion is to just: use them!

Feel free to ask questions below!

 

Jan 192015
 
Dartmouth

Hello there, incredible smart and talented applicants!

 

In just a short time, you will be starting your college career at what I believe will be a great institution for you, Dartmouth or otherwise.

 

Luckily, I found a great home at Dartmouth, but the application and admission process can be quite taxing. It causes you to constantly wonder whether or not you are “good enough”. Trust and believe that regardless of the decision, you and your application impressed the Admissions Officers at Dartmouth. The fact that you even chose to apply to Dartmouth showcases your bravery, drive, and determination. Here are 3 tips I recommend for dealing with a declined or rejected offer of admission. Best of luck!

 

Kevin Gillespie ‘15

 

  1. When one door closes many more can open

 

Remember that you are very smart and very talented. You have spent your entire life thus far proving exactly the aforementioned. Many colleges and universities will be impressed with what you offer to their community and their incoming class. If Dartmouth says “no”, just think of how many more schools now have the chance to say “yes”. Talk to your counselors, friends, family, mentors, etc. about where you should apply now. While Dartmouth hones incredible leaders and intellectuals, many institutions do the same. New doors are now wide open for you–now you have to dare to enter.

 

  1. Remember that you are more than your application

Though your application may be a summary of your hard work, it is certainly not the end all. Scores, grades, and accomplishments are only part of your story. When you begin the process of applying elsewhere, be sure to showcase as much about you as possible. I often find that the students who tend to be admitted do well at this. Treat your application as a story you want to tell. Something compelling, heartfelt, and colorful. Crafting such an application goes far beyond the paper form itself. Show your inner picasso or einstein. You are truly incredible. Now is your time to shine even brighter than before.

  1. Have fun

 

 

Remember that elementary school you? Yeah, the kid that didn’t think much about college,  jobs, research, or Model UN?  Remember to be this person. College is so much fun! You are about to have what may very well be the funnest time of your young life. Dartmouth may have been the platform for said fun, but even if it isn’t, all hope is not lost. College is more than a new start to the awesome resume you’ll build in the next four years–it’s the place where you’ll make new friends, interact with incredible professors, and build an incredible you! More so, don’t forget that you are finishing your last year of grade school. Create memories that will last a lifetime and remember that the college admissions process is only part of that.

Well, I hope these few tips help you to relax and recall how epic of a human being you are. The answer from Dartmouth may be “no”, but the fun, crazy, and overly engaging moments you hope to have are still straight ahead!

Dec 102014
 

Do you want to see the world but don’t have the means to? If you’re like me then the answer is yes.

Luckily, The William Jewett Tucker Foundation at Dartmouth (AKA The Tucker Foundation) provides loads of opportunities for undergrads to travel for little to no cost through their service trips.

The Alternative Spring Break (ASB) program allows students to lead and attend service-learning trips, both international and domestic, over spring break (in mid-March). On these trips, students conduct short-term projects for communities to help and learn about social justice issues such as poverty, homelessness, health disparities, and the environment.

This year, students will be traveling to Denver, the Dominican Republic, Florida, Washington DC, and West Virginia. I participated on the Dominican Republic trip in 2012 which focused on development in Batey Libertad, a Haitian migrant community in the western part of the country. ASBs typically cost students $200, which covers transportation, food, and housing. Luckily, financial aid is available for those who cannot afford the $200.

The Tucker Foundation also sponsors the Nicaragua Cross Cultural Education and Service Program (CCESP) to Siuna, Nicaragua for two weeks during winter break. This trip consists of two teams: Community Health & Community Development. The Community Health team is comprised of mostly undergrads and a handful of Geisel medical students and Dartmouth-affiliated doctors. They set-up a temporary health clinic and see patients from various communities of the area, as well as work with health promoters from each community to explore and address prevalent public health concerns. The Community Development team is made up of all undergrads who help with infrastructural development in the area. When I went on this trip in 2012, the Development team aided in a clean-water project.

Both the ASB and CCESP require a seminar during the entirety of the term before the trips to learn relevant cultural and political background of the countries and specific areas of travel/service.

View of Siuna, Nicaragua from above

View of Siuna, Nicaragua from above

To learn more about the Tucker Foundation, visit their website here: http://www.dartmouth.edu/~tucker/

I hope you consider participating in one of these programs if you come to Dartmouth! They were very rewarding experiences for me.

Apr 212014
 

Hey all,
So it’s been a while since my last post and it’s all because of how busy this term has been, but also because of how much fun the Spring that everyone is always outside enjoying the warmth on the Green and in town!

A few weekends ago, I got to attend a bioethics bowl in Chicago, along with three other Dartmouth students. We had prepared for this conference for a few weeks, over spring break, and then headed to Chicago with our cases prepared and ready for debate. Bioethics is an event that happens under the Ethics Institute, which also organizes a lot of cool events and offers an ethics minor (http://www.dartmouth.edu/~ethics/). It was a very great learning experience, and being there with many other students from other schools was great fun, too. It’s definitely nice to represent D away at a conference and to get to know fellow students. Finally, a picture of the team in the Windy City is attached.

Happy Spring!

bioethics1

Jan 242014
 

edxDartmouth announced yesterday that it has joined edX, the nonprofit online learning platform founded by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The partnership underscores the College’s commitment to leadership in the use of technology to enhance teaching and learning. Read more at: http://dartgo.org/edx

14 Winter Week 1

 College Life, Tradition, Upper Valley  Comments Off on 14 Winter Week 1
Jan 122014
 
Aug 282013
 
Baker Library

Baker Library

Visit Dartmouth during New England’s most spectacular season.

From October through November, we are offering a number of opportunities for prospective students and their families. Please check out the details below and remember to RSVP! Questions? Contact us via email.

October
Join us for an information session and campus tour Monday-Saturday.

  • Monday-Friday: We’re offering twice-daily information sessions and campus tours. RSVP today.
  • Saturdays
    • Oct. 5, 19 & 26 – Prospective students are encouraged to arrive early (10:30 a.m.) for a student forum where they can interact with current Dartmouth students and get answers to their most pressing college questions. After the student forum, everyone is invited to the regularly scheduled information session @ 11:15 a.m. followed by the campus tour @ Noon. RSVP here.
  • Saturday & Monday
    • Oct. 12 & 14 – Join us Homecoming Weekend for our special information sessions featuring a blend of Dartmouth faculty, admissions staff and students. Additional details coming soon. RSVP here.
  • November
    Join us for an information session and campus tour Monday-Saturday.

    • Monday-Friday: We’re offering twice-daily information sessions and campus tours. RSVP today.
    • Saturdays
      • Nov. 2, & 16 – Prospective students are encouraged to arrive early (10:30 a.m.) for a student forum where they can interact with current Dartmouth students and get answers to their most pressing college questions. After the student forum, everyone is invited to the regularly scheduled information session @ 11:15 a.m. followed by the campus tour @ Noon. RSVP here.
    • Saturday & Monday
      • Nov. 9 & 11 – Join us for Veteran’s Weekend and our special information sessions featuring a blend of Dartmouth faculty, admissions staff and students. Additional details coming soon. RSVP here.
    Dec 062012
     

    Chris O’Connell ’13 is the director of the Dartmouth Outing Club’s First-Year Trips Program.

    Class of 2017 – Welcome to Dartmouth!

    Congratulations on your acceptance and for getting through one of the more stressful parts of high school!  I remember how overwhelmingly crazy this time of year was with college decisions, so I hope you have had a few minutes to relax, celebrate, and get as excited as you possibly can for your next four years in Hanover.

    Students gather on the lawn of Robinson Hall for the start of their DOC Trip.

    My name is Chris O’Connell and I am the director of the Dartmouth Outing Club First-Year Trips Program – usually just known as “Trips.”  I am SO incredibly excited for you all to come to Dartmouth in 8ish months.  It seems like a long ways away (…because it is), but it will fly by and before you know it, we’ll be welcoming you to campus for your First-Year Trip!

    DOC First-Year Trips first got its start in 1935 when some older students involved in the College’s outing club invited some new students to go hiking with them before the school year started.  Since then, the program has evolved, grown, and expanded to be much more than exploring the beautiful New Hampshire outdoors – Trips is an introduction to the College’s traditions, a fun way to meet other ‘17s, and (most importantly) an exciting welcome into this community…your community!

    Each Trip is 5 days long and takes place right before the College’s official orientation program in late August/early September.  The program is entirely student-run: 60 support crew members, 300 trip leaders, and countless other student volunteers make DOC Trips an incredibly memorable and exciting experience for the incoming class.  Each trip has two, well-trained, upperclassmen leaders & 7-10 new students.  Don’t worry if you haven’t been in the wilderness before – we offer trips of all levels and varieties, everything from Cabin Camping to Whitewater Kayaking to Community Service to Mountain Biking.  We have added a lot of different types of trips over the years, so we hope you’ll find one that interests you!

    The hiking trip I had the chance to lead as a sophomore!

    I’m a member of the (great) Class of 2013, so it was only four years ago that I went on my own DOC Trip – rock climbing! I had never been climbing before, but I had the chance to learn and check out a beautiful portion of the Appalachian Trail.  Three years ago, I got to lead a hiking trip in the White Mountains and had a blast leading a group of freshmen through their first days at Dartmouth.  The experience you can have on your DOC Trips is one of Dartmouth’s most unique traditions — it’s a great way to get introduced to people different from yourself, learn about the Dartmouth community, and get connected to upperclassmen who can help you out during your time at the College.

    Everyone’s experience with DOC Trips is different, but we are working very hard to welcome YOU – whoever you are, wherever you came from, whoever you want to be in college – to your new home at Dartmouth.  Registration materials (with dates & details) for Trips will be sent to you later in 2013, but for now – enjoy this moment and get excited for an incredible four years!

    I’m looking forward to welcoming you to campus next fall! Enjoy the rest of your senior year!

    Chris O’Connell ‘13

    P.S. Can’t get enough of Dartmouth right now? Check out our Trips blog for more stories, photos, and excitement!

     

    Oct 112012
     

    Well, unlike many of the other posts on here, my junior fall at Dartmouth is not actually at Dartmouth! I’m taking the Fall off, courtesy of the D-Plan, and working in Washington, DC. I’m interning at both the Department of State and the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, for a total of at least 60 hours a week.

    Overseas Private Investment Corporation

    Overseas Private Investment Corporation

    I’m a DC area native so I’m living at home with my parents and taking the metro every day to commute.

    I know, I’m absolutely crazy. I go to State at 8 AM and leave at 4 PM for OPIC and work until at least 8 PM there! Thankfully, all of my friends are at school or the ones in DC are also working weekdays so I get to just come home and eat a home cooked meal before crashing into bed.

    So far though, it’s been an awesome experience! Both of the internships are really interesting and I’m learning a lot every day. Most days I’m so busy doing work that I look up and its 7:30 already and I didn’t even notice. I know that if the jobs weren’t as interesting the 12 hour days would be dreadful so I’m thankful they are.

    U.S. Department of State

    U.S. Department of State

    I’ve already been able to meet with the Ambassador of Panama, help with a North African entrepreneurship program, assist with multilateral agreements like the TPP and learn about development projects around the world.

    The Assistant Secretary of the Bureau I work in is actually a Dartmouth grad and was really excited to have a Dartmouth intern, so it’s just another example of the Big Green network that extends across the world. It’s crazy that I get to take things I learned about in government and economics classes at school and actually see them in action here at State and OPIC, and it helps me realize how lucky I am to be a Dartmouth student and the opportunties off-terms give me. So far, it’s all been so rewarding!

    Sep 112012
     

    Every Fall at Dartmouth, I’m reminded just how old I am.  As I walk around the beautiful Green, I hear the classic flair, loud music blasting and seemingly clueless ’16s wandering around!  And that’s when it hits me – I’m a junior!  In a way, Fall symbolizes a period of renewal.  It’s an exciting time to be sure — everybody coming back to campus after a lengthy break (except for the sophomores over summer!) and life at the Big Green continues.

    Not for me, though. For me, Fall 2012 is something new, something exciting. With three other guys and a vision, I am finally taking the Fall off to launch a start-up with $16,500 in capital raised from the Dartmouth Entrepreneurship Competition (if you’re curious, see here http://thedartmouth.com/2012/04/06/news/des). With an early prototype engineered and our value hypotheses validated, we’re currently pursuing different techniques to tighten the validated learning feedback loop between customers and our start-up. Ultimately, whether the start-up succeeds or fails by conventional metrics of valuation is personally irrelevant. In my mind, success stems from personal growth and evolution. What really finalized this decision to pursue the start-up path was the realization that as someone with a vision and capital, I really had nothing to lose and everything to gain!

    So Fall still, to me, is a renewal in some senses.