Emilia Hull

Mar 052014
 

At Dartmouth there are of hundreds of possible classes one can take, yet which ones are the ones that stand out, the “must-takes”? Every Dartmouth undergrad may have a different list, but one that crops up a lot and is on my personal list is ENGS 12: Design Thinking.

What is this ? Weird name, huh? Well, Design Thinking is actually exactly what it sounds like… you think about how things are designed – anything and everything from objects (ex: a table) to technology (ex: iPhone). And you not only think about design, but think about how to improve design and come up with your own!

My second design project. Can you guess the theme?

Yet what skills do you learn, how does this happen? Main skill: learning to be creative! In class you will find out all types of different brainstorming activities, lateral thinking, and so much more! This is also a project-heavy class, so you get your hands dirty, and group-based – at times frustrating, but an invaluable skill.

Myself modeling one of the many ways you can wear the modular bag – the bag everyone has been waiting for!

This class is not only fun, but the skills you will learn (anything from working intensely in a group to photoshop!) will be invaluable in other aspects of your life: other classes, job interviews, new solutions to old problems… You will not regret taking this class.

The App You’ve Always Wanted: Tinder for Exercise Buddies!

To wrap this post up, this is just one of the many Dartmouth classes that has made an impression on me and changed me for the better. But who knows what gems you will discover? Take-away message: take classes outside your comfort zone – you might be amazed at the rewards.

Feb 242014
 

All these posts about snow – and the several-feet-high snow banks around me – have made me miss a time where there was no snow on the ground… specifically last winter when I flew South to the tropics to avoid the snow.

One of the biggest attractions for me (as a potential Bio-major at the time) was the Bio FSP to Costa Rica and the Cayman Islands. I was determined to go (who wouldn’t want to?), and last year (as a junior) I got my wish. I had already heard all about the amazing adventures I would have from past FSPers, who wouldn’t stop raving about their trip, and though they had also mentioned the harder parts, all I retained was how awesome it was. Little did I know I was about to embark on one of the most rewarding, yet  physically and mentally draining experiences of my life.

First of all, a little background. The FSP is separated into three segments, each led by a different professor, with two 3-week segments in Costa Rica (terrestrial field biology) and one in Little Cayman (marine biology). There are usually about 15 students and 2 TAs on the trip. Fun fact: the TAs on my trip were married and thinking about starting a family… and they did. Nine months after our trip, this little bundle of joy arrived:

Our little FSP wonder: Cami!

Our little FSP wonder: Cami!

The trip was amazing. I saw animals I didn’t think existed (look up tapir. seriously.), witnessed the birth of a baby howler monkey (bloody affair) that was then interrupted by a puma (scary stuff!), and managed to wade into a marsh to look at pretty flowers only to find myself running from a croc with leeches stuck to me! Below is another one of my misadventures…

 

Me stuck in quicksand after a small competition to see which of us could go deepest and still get out... I lost.

Me stuck in quicksand after a competition to see which of us could go deepest and still get out… I lost. They pulled me out.

 

Yet it was not all fun and games. Throughout this time we were also doing incredibly important work – observing nature around us, coming up with questions (and answers!) to satisfy our curiosity, and conducting experiments to discover more about the world around us. We also had to repeatedly come up with solutions to problems on the spot, learn to work in groups (and multiple groups at once!), research and write papers practically overnight, as well as constantly explore the environment around us and take advantage of all the unique opportunities!

Traveling to new destinations - always fun in the sun!

Traveling to new destinations – it’s always fun in the sun!

This was one of the most exhausting experiences of my life – severe lack of sleep (and privacy!), constantly on the go (your “off” days were travel days… not very relaxing when you’re lugging around all your equipment), prolonged separation from family and friends… yet it was all worth it. I came out of this experience with a small close-knit group of friends, some memorable stories, and with more strength of character and determination that I had before. I encourage everyone to embark on one of these adventures before graduating, for though you may complain along the way, you will always look back on it fondly afterwards. For you, BIO FSP 2013!

Our attempt at spelling out BIO FSP 2013

Our attempt at spelling out BIO FSP 2013

 

Midterm Madness

 Posted by at 2:01 pm  No Responses »
Feb 102014
 

Hello Prospies!

I’m Emilia Hull, Dartmouth ’14 (senior year!), a Biology major hailing from Brussels, Belgium, yet I’m actually half Greek half American. Bit of a mouthful, huh? I’m excited to join the Dartmouth Direct Bloggers for my last six months here at Dartmouth (*tear*) – the wildest, craziest, most amazing experience of my life. So far…

Me with one of my favorite 15's (Emily Leede) earlier this year

Me with one of my favorite 15′s (Emily Leede) earlier this year

So there have been a few posts on Winter Carnival, and the fun events you can participate during this four-day extravaganza (ex: Polar Bear jump, human dogsled races, etc.). Yet the reason for Winter Carnival for me is because we ALL need a break after midterm madness. The 1-2 weeks before students are packed into the library cramming those last few quotes into their brains before rushing off to take a midterm, or typing like crazy to make that midnight deadline for a paper.

My Design Thinking group's final whiteboard presentation for the modular bag

My Design Thinking group’s final whiteboard presentation for the modular bag

Personally I had either a midterm or presentation every day leading up to Friday. Did I sleep very much? No. Did that stop me from going out and enjoying Winter Carnival? Absolutely not. I employed one of the many skills I have developed while at Dartmouth – the ability to function on little sleep, whether I’m studying or socializing with friends :) So get ready for an intensive journey upon enrolling at Dartmouth, where you will go straight from the library where you’re cranking your last sentence for a paper to the Green to cheer on your floor mate in Human Dog Sled races and grabbing Chili to go to warm yourself up.

With a few friends (including graduates!) on the Ice Sculpture of Winter Carnival

With a few friends (including graduates!) on the Ice Sculpture of Winter Carnival

Good Luck!