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In the Spotlight

New members of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences

In announcing the most recent members of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences—Michael Casey, A&S Grad '92, and James Haxby—Dean Carol Folt says, "I am delighted to welcome these two remarkable scholars to Dartmouth. They bring further strength to two programs where the College has already shown great innovation and leadership: music and neuroscience.  I am certain that they will feel at home here with our strong faculty of scholars and will join them in testing, and in many cases breaking through, the boundaries of interdisciplinary study." Casey is professor of music, and Haxby is professor of psychological and brain sciences.

Michael A. Casey, A&S Grad '92
Professor of Music

Michael Casey
Michael Casey, A&S Grad ′92 (Photo by Sarah Memmi)

Michael Casey received his Ph.D. in media arts and sciences from the Media Laboratory at MIT in 1998. Following undergraduate study at the University of East Anglia, where he received a B.A. (Hons) in music, he completed a master's degree in electroacoustic music at Dartmouth. Prior to returning to the College, Casey was professor of computer science at Goldsmiths, University of London, where he also directed the Media Futures Laboratory and the B.Sc. program in creative computing. He has previously been affiliated with City University, London, and the Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratory in Cambridge, Mass.

Casey explores computing as a creative medium and as a means to organize large audio-visual media collections for interactive performance. His research has been widely published in refereed conference proceedings and journals in the fields of information retrieval, acoustics and signal processing, and computer music. He has written three books on creative computing for the University of London, has provided chapters for numerous others, and is the author of the audio matching software, Sound Spotter, and other audio matching tools. Casey holds two U.S. patents, with others pending, and serves as an editor for the MPEG-7 international standard for the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).

An accomplished trombonist, Casey's work as composer and musician has been performed, recorded, and exhibited internationally. His courses in the Department of Music include Digital Musics, Sonic Arts and the Internet, and The Music of Today.

James V. Haxby
Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences

James Haxby
James Haxby (Courtesy James Haxby)

James Haxby, professor of psychological and brain sciences, joined the Dartmouth faculty in January as the Evans Family Distinguished Professor. He also directs the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and the Dartmouth Brain Imaging Center.

A cognitive neuroscientist whose research investigates the human brain systems that control visual perception, attention, and memory, Haxby uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data to map face recognition and study its role in social communication. He is also involved in developing new methods for analyzing fMRI data using machine learning pattern classifiers. Haxby's work is widely published, including pieces in Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Science, the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, and Neuropsychologia.

He holds a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Minnesota. Following his graduation from Carleton College, with a B.A. in psychology, Haxby studied at Universität Bonn as a Fulbright-DAAD Scholar. Prior to coming to Dartmouth, Haxby was professor of psychology at Princeton University and was previously affiliated with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Md., specifically the National Institute of Mental Health, and the National Institute on Aging.

By KELLY SEAMAN

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Last Updated: 6/23/08