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Meeting of the Minds

New members of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Over the past two years, some 50 scholars have become members of the Dartmouth faculty. Representing a broad spectrum of teaching and research interests, they bring a wealth of experience to their new positions. Those who have recently joined the faculty as associate or full professors, or as the holders of endowed chairs, are profiled in this first issue of Focus on Faculty.

Rebecca Biron
Rebecca Biron

Rebecca Biron
Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese
A widely published scholar whose teaching has been recognized with numerous awards, Rebecca Biron teaches and conducts research on Latin American narratives, with special focus on Mexican literature. She holds a B.A. from the University of Georgia and a Ph.D. from the University of Iowa.

Biron is the author of Murder and Masculinity: Violent Fictions of 20th Century Latin America (2000), and is completing The Anxiety of Desire: Elena Garro and Mexico's Modern Dreams. She is also producing an edited volume, and has begun work on a third book, slated for completion in 2008. Her current research focuses on Mexican discourse about modernization and globalization.

Before coming to Dartmouth, Biron was an associate professor of Spanish at the University of Miami, where she was faculty coordinator of the Interdisciplinary Studies Programs, director of undergraduate studies in Spanish, and associate director of graduate studies. She was a member of the executive committee of the Center for Latin American Studies and the Center for Study of the Americas. She most recently served as director of the Latin American Studies Program at Miami, a position she held from 2003 until she joined the Dartmouth faculty in 2006.

Andrew Campbell
Andrew T. Campbell

Andrew T. Campbell
Associate Professor of Computer Science
Andrew T. Campbell comes to Dartmouth from Columbia University, where he was an associate professor of electrical engineering. He led a systems research group there that worked with industrial partners to develop network algorithms, protocols, and systems architectures for the Internet, with particular focus on mobility and wireless challenges, and the need to make the Internet more programmable for rapid deployment of new network services. He was educated in England and holds a B.Sc. from Aston University in Birmingham, an M.Sc. from City University of London, and a Ph.D. from Lancaster University. He received the National Science Foundation Career Award in 1999 for research in programmable wireless networking and spent his 2003-2004 sabbatical year at the Computer Lab, Cambridge University, as an EPSRC Visiting Fellow.

At Dartmouth, Campbell leads the Sensor Network Systems Laboratory, where he works with students on the development of a new wireless sensor edge network for the Internet. He is also a member of the Center for Mobile Computing and the Institute for Security Technology Studies. He came to academia after 10 years in the telecommunications industry designing computer networks in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and the United States-experience that shaped his desire to solve practical design problems relevant to telecommunications.

Campbell also leads the Armstrong Project, based at Columbia, which investigates new technologies for wireless sensor and "ad hoc" networks. The integration of sensors-tiny wireless devices that are capable of forming large sensor webs with thousands of distributed devices-is a critical frontier in Internet development.

He is also a member of the MAP and Dragonfly Projects. MAP (Measure, Analyze, Protect) seeks to find WiFi security solutions in campus-scale wireless networks. The Dragonfly Project is investigating new open spectrum radio and wireless networks that could replace the radio spectrum now used for cell phones, television, and WiFi networks.

Lisa Fleischer
Lisa Fleischer

Lisa Fleischer
Associate Professor of Computer Science
Lisa Fleischer has taught at Columbia University and Carnegie Mellon University, and she has been a research staff member at IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center. A graduate of Harvard College, she received both M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Cornell University.

Fleischer's research focuses on algorithm design and analysis. She studies algorithms for problems in network routing and design, economics and game theory, combinatorial optimization, and linear and integer programming. She is a contributor to several pending patent applications, and her articles have appeared in numerous scholarly journals. Fleischer is a recipient of the Fulkerson Prize from the Math Programming Society. She is the coprincipal investigator, with Richard Cole of New York University, on "Information, Prices, Markets, and Local Algorithms," supported by the National Science Foundation.

She is an associate editor of Mathematics of Operations Research and Operations Research, and served in that role until 2005 for Operations Research Letters.

Richard Granger, Jr.
Richard H. Granger, Jr.

Richard Granger Jr.
William H. Neukom 1964 Distinguished Professor in Computational Science
Richard Granger Jr. is the inaugural holder of the William H. Neukom 1964 Distinguished Professorship in Computational Science, a new endowed chair at Dartmouth created as part of Board of Trustees Chair William H. Neukom's '64 gift establishing the Neukom Institute for Computational Science. Granger serves as director of the institute, which seeks to strengthen collaborative research between computer science and other disciplines. He is also a professor of psychological and brain sciences. A leading authority on computational analysis and cognitive neuroscience, Granger is a pioneer in the development of emerging disciplines and crossdisciplinary collaborations between brain function, computational analysis, and observational and pharmacological brain studies.

Granger received his B.A. from MIT and his Ph.D. from Yale University. Before coming to Dartmouth, he was a professor at the University of California, Irvine, and director of its Brain Engineering Laboratory, where he developed several research studies that led to patents and products, including novel computational methods that are used with electroencephalographic (EEG) data.

He has written extensively on topics including the physical foundations of brain function, memory and learning, neural networks, and computational algorithms as diagnostic tools.

An elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), he has recently received awards from the University of California for excellence in mentoring underrepresented minorities and in undergraduate research. His work has been funded by numerous agencies and organizations, including the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

Jamie Horton
Jamie Horton

Jamie Horton
Associate Professor of Theater
Jamie Horton, actor, director, writer, producer, and teacher, comes to Dartmouth from the Tony Award-winning Denver Center Theatre Company, where he was a principal actor and played leading roles in over 80 productions. His film and television credits include Lovestreams, Double Obsession, Wavelength, Perry Mason, Land of Little Rain, and Prison for Children. A graduate of Princeton University, he received his M.F.A. from the National Theatre Conservatory.

In addition to his work in film, theater, and television, he has been an adjunct faculty member of the Denver Center Theatre Academy and the National Theatre Conservatory, and has conducted master classes and special projects for the Case Western Reserve University/Cleveland Play House M.F.A. Program and the Denver School of the Arts.

Horton has written for children's television and for the NBC series St. Elsewhere, and he cowrote and played a starring role in Top of the World, featured in the 1993 Toronto and Denver Film Festivals. His latest film is A Rumor of Angels. Horton's producing credits include the independent feature Octavia and Monty, and his directing credits include world premieres of Inna Beginning and The Scarlet Letter at the Denver Center Theatre Company; National Theatre Conservatory productions of Arms and the Man and Our Country's Good; Hay Fever, Steel Magnolias, and To Fool the Eye at the Commonweal Theatre Company; Pan & Boone and cowboylily at the Creede Repertory Theatre; and Fiction at the Curious Theatre Company. In 2005 he directed the late Wendy Wasserstein's play The Heidi Chronicles at Dartmouth.

Dean Lacy
Dean Lacy

Dean Lacy
Professor of Government
Dean Lacy brings a broad spectrum of analytical and methodological expertise to bear on his teaching and research in American politics, game theory, and statistics. His work illuminates the relationships between economic and political issues, voter behavior, and election outcomes, and he is a leading expert on electoral institutions and behavior, political parties, Congress, the presidency, and public opinion. A graduate of the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, he received his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Duke University. Before joining the Dartmouth faculty, Lacy taught at The Ohio State University, where he was an associate professor of political science.

Lacy is known primarily for demonstrating that people's opinions on political issues are more complex and sophisticated than public opinion polls typically show. He has written extensively on third-party candidates in American politics and is currently working on several new articles and books, including "Political Opinions: The Structure and Expression of Political Attitudes and Preferences;" Taxing, Spending, Red States, and Blue States; and Voting in a System of Checks and Balances.

He has been recognized for excellence in teaching with the Sphinx and Mortarboard Outstanding Faculty Award and the Political Science Department Teaching Award, both at Ohio State, where he was also a nominee for the College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Teacher Award.

Lacy has served as a consultant to several state and national political campaigns, as a political analyst for the BBC, CNN, The New York Times, and the Ohio News Network, and as an election observer for the 2000 Presidential Election in Taiwan, ROC, sponsored by the Taiwan Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Andrew McCann
Andrew McCann

Andrew McCann
Associate Professor of English
Andrew McCann comes to Dartmouth after a distinguished teaching career in Australia, including three years at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, and six years at the University of Melbourne. He holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of Melbourne and a Ph.D. from Cornell University.

McCann works primarily on 19th-century British literature, with an interest in critical theory and its ability to engage with contemporary political contexts and creative practices. His first academic monograph, Cultural Politics in the 1790s: Literature, Radicalism and the Public Sphere (1999), explores the relationship between romantic aesthetics and political radicalism. His most recent monograph, Marcus Clarke's Bohemia: Literature and Modernity in Colonial Melbourne (2004), uses the career of the novelist and journalist Marcus Clarke to discuss colonial Australian adaptations of metropolitan literary sensibilities. In recent research, McCann traces the relationship between evolutionary anthropology and aesthetic experience, in Britain and the settler colonies of 19th-century Australia, focusing on the visions of extinction that appear in the popular fiction of empire.

McCann has also published two novels, which he sees as growing out of his academic work. The White Body of Evening (2002) draws on his archival research on colonial culture. Subtopia (2005) explores his interest in the role of suburbia in contemporary Australian fiction and consciousness.

McCann is teaching courses in Victorian literature and culture and romantic literature, in which he and his students explore the relationship between literary form and historical context.

Daryl G. Press
Daryl G. Press

Daryl G. Press
Associate Professor of Government
An authority on conflict and its effects on world politics, Daryl Press is the author of Calculating Credibility: How Leaders Assess Military Threats (2005). A graduate of the University of Chicago, he received his Ph.D. from MIT. Press received John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Summer Research Grants in 1997 and 1998, and fellowships from the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard, and from the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University. He has conducted research at the U.S. Army War College. Press is returning to Dartmouth from the University of Pennsylvania, where he was associate professor of political science in the 2005-2006 academic year.

With research interests including decision-making during international crises, the economic effects of war, and the effect of changing technology on the future conduct of warfare, Press brings his expertise directly into the classroom where he teaches courses on U.S. foreign policy, the role of nuclear weapons in the 21st century, and the future of warfare.

He is currently working with coauthor Eugene Gholz, on "Economic Globalization and the Effects of War on Neutrals," which examines how wars affect the economies of countries that remain out of the conflicts. In "The End of Mutual Assured Destruction: Nuclear Weapons and U.S. Primacy," he and coauthor Keir Lieber study the changing nuclear balance of power and America's pursuit of nuclear primacy.

Eugene Santos, Jr.
Eugene Santos, Jr.

Eugene Santos Jr.
Professor of Engineering, Thayer School of Engineering
Eugene Santos Jr., holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from Brown University. Before coming to Dartmouth, he taught in the college of engineering at the University of Connecticut at Storrs, where he also served as the associate and interim director of the university's Taylor L. Booth Engineering Center for Advanced Technologies, and was the director of the Intelligent Distributed Information Systems Laboratory. Earlier, he held faculty positions at the Air Force Institute of Technology at Wright-Patterson AFB.

Santos is an expert in modern statistical and probabilistic methods with applications to intelligent systems, uncertain reasoning, and decision science. He is a leader in the growing community of artificial intelligence researchers who are advancing techniques for constructing models and software systems that can effectively reason in the presence of noise and uncertainty. Most recently, he has pioneered new research on user and adversarial behavioral modeling.

His work has been supported by numerous federal grants spanning a broad range of research programs, including the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Science Foundation, as well as various U.S. intelligence agencies. His current programs involve fused intent systems, emergent adversarial modeling, the impacts of culture and society on behavior and decision-making, intelligent information retrieval, and computational insight.

Michelle Warren
Michelle Warren

Michelle Warren
Associate Professor of Comparative Literature
Michelle Warren is a leading medievalist who specializes in French and British studies. Her comparative approach to early texts has brought new insight to the fields of French medieval literature, romance philology, Arthurian studies, translation theory, and postcolonial theory. She is the author of History on the Edge: Excalibur and the Borders of Britain, 1100-1300 (2000). Warren comes to Dartmouth from a distinguished teaching career at the University of Miami, where she received the Scholarly Excellence Award from the College of Arts and Sciences and a University Excellence in Teaching Award. A graduate of the University of California, she received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University.

Throughout her career, Warren has been active in curricular development and oversight, most recently as director of graduate studies for the Ph.D. in romance studies and workshop leader for new teaching assistants in the Instructional Advancement Center, both at the University of Miami. At Dartmouth, she is a member of the Leslie Humanities Center advisory committee and the Comparative Literature Program's steering committee.

She is coeditor of Arts of Calculation: Quantifying Thought in Early Modern Europe (2004), and Postcolonial Moves: Medieval Through Modern (2003). She is currently working on a project on Creole medievalism and other comparative studies of early French and English literary works and contexts.

Read about more new members of the Dartmouth faculty.

By LAUREL STAVIS

Questions or comments about this article? We welcome your feedback.

Last Updated: 5/30/08