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Letter from the Dean

Letter from the Editor

Small Solutions to Big Problems

Using an Algorithm to Solve Disease Mysteries

Shedding New Light on Cellular Dynamics

People, Places and Things

National Endowment for the Humanities Awards

Guggenheim Foundation Fellowships

Drink Your Milk and Take Your Vitamins

Tinkering with the Biological Clock

Strangers in Their Own Lands

Will the Publishers Perish?

Past Meets Present

A Letter From the Editor - Laurel Stavis, Editor


The Correlates of War Project, from which Professor Allan Stam and his colleagues worked to devise a system of analysis that could be used to predict the duration and outcomes of wars, contains comprehensive data for armed conflicts stretching back to 1816. The lessons of history, when viewed through this statistical lens, give us reason to believe that war is peculiarly resistant to the tides of technological change. Smart weapons and Stealth bombers are impressive, to be sure, but do they guarantee that modern wars will fit neatly into the rapid-fire rhythm of television news?

Had the Correlates data stretched back to the late 1700's when the events leading up to the American Revolution were taking place, such an analysis would have been of immeasurable value to the Colonial army, as well as to the Republic's nascent institutions of higher learning. By the time of the Boston Tea Party, all nine Colonial colleges had been established, including Dartmouth, founded in 1769 on the frontiers of the northern forest. Perched uncomfortably between the conflict in Boston to the south and Canada to the north, Dartmouth faced great uncertainty about whether it would survive the war with England. As it turned out, Dartmouth would become one of the only Colonial colleges that sustained its teaching activities throughout the Revolution. In fact, it managed to graduate a class for each grueling year of an uprising the British thought would be over quickly and easily.

As editor of Dartmouth Faculty: Scholarship Today, I am pleased to introduce you to Professor Stam's research, and the teaching and scholarship of all of the faculty members and their students featured in our first issue. I welcome your feedback and hope you will visit our website at www.dartmouth.edu/~dartfac. I would also like to thank the members of our editorial and production staff for their creativity, hard work, and expertise. We are also grateful to Deans Gazzaniga, Danos, Spielberg and Duncan, and to our faculty advisory board. They provide leadership, encouragement and above all, inspiration. A special note of thanks is due to Dr. Ethan Dmitrovsky, who was interim dean of the Dartmouth Medical School as this publication began to take shape.

Laurel Stavis, Editor

I am pleased to introduce you to Professor Stam's research, and the teaching and scholarship of all of the faculty members and their students featured in our first issue.
 
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