Area concentrations/East Asia
Home
About the program
Academics
AMES courses
Area concentrations
East Asia
concentration
Middle East
South/Southeast Asia
Central Asia
Interregional Studies
Study abroad
Faculty
FAQ
East Asia Concentration

The East Asia area concentration includes study of China, Japan, and Korea. Because AMES extensive course offerings, students are able to focus on either modern or traditional East Asia, and to do advanced study in an academic discipline of their choice. AMES strongly encourages majors to undertake sustained study of Japanese or Chinese language through the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Literatures (AMELL). AMES' foreign exchange program with Yonsei University in Seoul provides opportunities for Korean language study.

MAJOR

  • 1. Students concentrating on East Asia must meet the general requirements of the AMES major: ten courses with one meeting AMES' Interregional Requirement and one being a Culminating Experience. For details see: AMES major requirements. Research undertaken for the Culminating Experience should conform with the student's area concentration.
  • 2. Students should identify a faculty advisor as soon as possible and should remain in close contact with that advisor through their Dartmouth career. Students should work closely with their faculty advisors to ensure that their major is intellectually coherent and not a random selection of courses. Use the East Asia area-concentration worksheet to plan your major.
  • 3. Students are encouraged to pursue focused majors in one of Korean, Japanese, or Chinese studies, but because the histories and cultures of these countries are closely intertwined, AMES recommends that majors include some courses outside their main country of focus. The following list of pan-East Asian courses are ideal courses for this requirement, but students may choose another in consultation with the faculty advisor.
  • PAN-EAST ASIAN COURSES:

    • AMES 24/THEA 24 Asian Performance Tradition (with written work on East Asia) (Chin)
    • ARTH 17 Special Topics in the History of Art (with East Asian topic) (Hockley/Kim)
    • ARTH 66 The Camera in Nineteenth-Century Asia (Hockley)
    • ARTH 67 Contemporary Arts of Asia (Hockley)
    • HIST 8 Body Parts, Body Wholes: An Introduction to the Comparative History of Medicine (Suh)
    • HIST 74 Intellectual History of East Asia (Crossley)
    • HIST 77 Imperialism in Modern East Asia (Ericson)
    • HIST 96.1 The Mongols (Crossley)
    • HIST 96.5 Colonialism and Culture in Asia and Africa (Faculty)
    • GOV 50 Topics in International Relations: The Rise of East Asia (Lind)
    • GOV 81.03 Economic Growth and Reform in the Emerging Economies (with written work on East Asia) (Vandewalle)
  • 4. All remaining courses should be selected from the list of Approved Courses for the East Asia Concentration (see below).
  • 5. Students may include up to two AMES 85 Independent Research courses provided they are supervised by an AMES affiliated faculty member with expertise in East Asia. Students wishing to pursue advanced research should consider AMES 86 Advanced Independent Research.

MINOR

APPROVED COURSES FOR EAST ASIA AREA CONCENTRATION

| Korean Studies | Japanese Studies | Chinese Studies |

Korean Studies

AMES 11/HIST 9 Introduction to Korean Culture
This course provides an introduction to Korean culture and history, examining Korea's visual and textual expressions from the pre-modern age to the twentieth century. What are the origins of Korean national and cultural identities? How have Korean claims of cultural distinctiveness been manifested and modified over time? Tracing answers to these questions simultaneously helps us consider how and why Korea has entered America's consciousness. As Korea matters to the US not simply as a fact but as a project, this course avoids portraying Korea through any generalized statements or uncritical categories. Rather, students are encouraged to explore novel perspectives on Korea and thereby unravel their own prejudices and agendas. No prior acquaintance with the Korean language is required. Dist: Soc; WCult: CI (Kim and Suh)

AMES 21.01 Cultural Struggles in Colonial Korea
This course explores Korean history between 1876 and 1945, as Korea entered the modern period. First, we will examine how Japan, China, and Korea responded to Western imperialism in the 19th century, and then how China and Korea responded to Japanese imperialism early in the 20th century. The second half of the class will explore the Japanese colonial government's assimilation policy during the colonial period in Korea, and how Korea was affected by and reacted to various aspects of this policy. The establishment of historiography, formulation of aesthetic and cultural cannons, and shaping of images of Koreans and their land will be explored by examining diverse media including literature, photographs, exhibition catalogues, and other primary sources. The class will conclude with the continuing legacy of the Japanese colonial period. All readings are in English. No prior knowledge of Korea or Korean language assumed. Dist:ART or INT; WCult: NW (Kim)

AMES 21.02/HIST6 Science and Technology in the Making of Modern Korea
Science has often been claimed to be universal. Jesuits, Protestant missionaries, scientists, revolutionaries, and policy makers often rely on scientific knowledge as they consider it to be objective and reasonable, hence it helps them easily cross cultural, linguistic, and national boundaries. By using science as a lens, this course aims to view innovations and dilemmas of Korean society. How has the history of science elaborated aspects of Korea that otherwise are overlooked or misunderstood? How does science help us understand Koreans' desires and despair in transforming knowledge making systems both in local and global settings? Students who are interested in both "the history of science and technology in non-western settings" and "East Asian studies" are welcome. All readings are in English. No prior knowledge of Korea or Korean language assumed. Dist: SOC; WCult: CI (Suh)

AMES 21.03 Exploring Korea Through Film
This course explores cinematic representations of Korean history and the diverse interpretations of social, cultural, and political issues portrayed in modern and contemporary Korean films.  The course is structured by thematic issues, including: Korean ideas about politics and monarchy, North Korea's self-identity, rapid industrialism, South Korea's democratic movement, and Korean's concept of love. The class will view Korean films, and also read novels depicting similar issues and compare and contrast the theatrical and literary representations. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW (Kim)

AMES 21.04/HIST 6 North Korea, Origins and Transition
This course explores the history of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) from a global perspective. Topics include the Japanese colonial legacies; liberation, division, and foreign occupation between 1945 and 1950; the meanings of the Korean War; comparing Kim Il-Sung's North Korean revolution with Park Chung-hee's state building in the South; the reality of "Self-Reliance"; social control and everyday life; and issues around human rights, famine, and defectors. Dist: SOC, WCult: NW (Suh)

AMES 21.05/HIST 78/REL 32 Christianity in Korea
This course examines Korean Christians' beliefs and practices, which have shaped and brought tensions to current socio-religious phenomena. Topics include the Korean origins of Christianity, the encounter between Catholicism and Neo-Confucianism in the eighteenth century, Protestant missionaries' role in medicine and education, the rise of nationalism and Christianity under Japanese colonialism, churches in North Korea, Pentecostalism under South Korea's rapid industrialization and democratization, Korean missionaries around the world, and Christian musicians and entertainers in Korea, as well as the interface between gender and Korean Christian culture. Dist: TMV, WCult: NW (Suh)

AMES 21.06/ ARTH 61 Introduction to Korean Art
This course will introduce the arts and culture of Korea from the prehistoric period through the twentieth century. Significant examples of painting, ceramics, sculpture, and architecture will be closely examined in their political, social, and cultural (Chinese and Japanese) contexts. We will explore how different cultures and ideas produced distinctive aesthetics, and how East Asian motifs were incorporated into traditional Korean art. We will see how Korea struggled to find its artistic identity within the international context during the 20th century. No prior knowledge of Korean art or history, or of the Chinese or Korean language, is expected. Dist: ART; WCult: NW (Kim)

AMES 21.07/ARTH 68 Modern and Contemporary Korean Art
This course examines the art and culture of Korea from the end of the 19th century through the 20th century.  During this period Korea experienced the fall of its last 500-year-long dynasty, annexation to Japan, the Korean war, division into two Koreas, democratization, and internationalization/globalization.  The class will explore how visual art, including paintings, ceramics, architecture, photographs, posters, and film reflected and expressed the political, socio-economic, and cultural changes and concerns of each period, in both South and North Korea. Dist: ART, WCult: NW (Kim)

AMES 85 Independent Research (with Korean topic)

AMES 86 Advanced Independent Research (with Korean topic)

AMES 87 Honors Thesis (with Korean topic)

AMES Yonsei Exchange Program in Seoul, Korea
Students interested in focusing on Korean studies are strongly encourage to participate in AMES's exchange program with Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea. Yonsei offers a broad range of Korean-related (and East Asian) courses, all of which receive credit towards an AMES major or minor.

Other Korean studies courses accepted for AMES credit:

  • ARTH 16, 17, 18 Special Topics in the History of Art (with Korean topic) (Kim)
  • HIST 6 Experimental Courses in History: (with Korean topic) (Suh)

Japanese Studies

AMES 13/JPN 10 Introduction to Japanese Culture
Japanese cultural history through a broad survey of literature, art, social and political institutions, and popular culture. Modern conceptions of Japan and formations of Japanese identity have evolved under the pressures created by radical swings between periods of wholesale appropriation of foreign cultural forms and periods of extreme isolation. The course will trace the evolution of Japanese culture by examining the ways in which cultural archetypes are distinguished in Japan. Taught in English. Dist: LIT; WCult: CI (Dorsey)

AMES 43.03 Tokyo and Shanghai as Ideas: Urban Space/Imagined Modernity
Tokyo and Shanghai are not just major centers of political and economic activity. They are also ideas, functioning as imagined space that is backdrop for and symbol of the desires, aspirations, and dislocations characteristic of contemporary Asian societies. This course examines the hold Tokyo and Shanghai have had on East Asian writers, artists, and intellectuals, and the role these metropolises currently play in the globalization of modern culture. Dist: Lit or Int; WCult: NW (Washburn)

AMES 43.06 China in the Japanese Imagination: Translations of Identity
China has profoundly influenced every formative element of identity in Japan: language, legal and political institutions, religion, philosophy, and the visual and literary arts. This course surveys key historical moments - the Taika Reforms of the seventh century, mid-Heian appropriations of Tang court society, Tokugawa adaptations of Ming and Qing culture - to examine how the process of translating Chinese cultural forms radically reshaped Japanese society and impacted the vexed modern relationship between the two nations. Dist: INT or LIT; WCult: NW (Washburn)

AMES 43.07 Japanese Anime and Global Culture
An examination of major trends in popular visual culture in Japan since the 1980s focused on the growth in production and distribution of animated films, tv series, and video games. Screenings will include works by Miyazaki Hayao, Rintaro, Takahata Isao, and Kon Satoshi. Readings will include both critical and historical sources that will provide the social and economic contexts for the development of the anime industry, theories of animation, and the global impact of Japanese popular culture. Dist: ART; WCult: NW (Washburn)

AMES 85 Independent Research (with Japanese topic)

AMES 86 Advanced Independent Research (with Japanese topic)

AMES 87 Honors Thesis (with Japanese topic)

Other Japanese studies courses accepted for AMES credit:

  • ARTH 17 Special Topics in the History of Art (with Japanese topic) (Hockley)
  • ARTH 63 Sacred Art and Architecture of Japan (Hockley)
  • ARTH 64 The Japanese Painting Tradition (Hockley)
  • ARTH 65 Japanese Prints (Hockley)
  • JAPN 11 Special Topics in Japanese Studies (offered on the Japan LSA+) (Dorsey)
  • JAPN 22, 23 Intermediate Japanese Language (offered on the Japan LSA+) (Dorsey)
  • JAPN 31, 32, 33, (Ishida, Watanabe)
  • JAPN 41 Advanced Japanese Language (Ishida, Watanabe)
  • JAPN 42 Advanced Japanese Language (Faculty)
  • JAPN 43 Advanced Japanese Language (Faculty)
  • JAPN 59 Independent Advanced Study in Japanese Language and Literature (Dorsey)
  • JAPN 61 Topics in 20th Century Japanese Literature and Culture (Faculty)
  • JAPN 62 Topics in Early Modern Japanese Literature and Culture (Faculty)
  • JAPN 63 Topics in Classical Japanese Literature and Culture (Faculty)
  • JAPN 81 Topics in Japanese Literature and Culture (Faculty)
  • GOVT 40 Topics in Area Politics: Politics of Japan (Horiuchi)
  • HIST 5.5 The Emergence of Modern Japan (Ericson)
  • HIST 77 IMperialism in Modern East Asia (Ericson)
  • HIST 79 Postwar Japan: From Occupied Nation to Economic Superpower (Ericson)
  • HIST 96.3 Topics in Modern Japanese History (Ericson)
  • HIST 96.5 Colonialism and Culture in Asia and Africa (Faculty)

Chinese Studies

AMES 10/REL 10 The Religions of China
An introduction to China's three major religions-Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism-through the reading of classic texts. Also, a look at important elements in Chinese folk religion: ancestor worship, temples, heavens and hells, and forms of divination. Special attention will be paid to the importance of government in Chinese religious thought and to continuity and change in the history of Chinese religion. Dist: TMV; WCult: NW (Raz)

AMES 12/CHIN 10 Introduction to Chinese Culture
The aim of this course is to provide students with a basic knowledge and appreciation of Chinese culture. We will examine the evolution of Chinese culture and identity from the earliest Chinese dynasties, dating back more than 3500 years, to the present day. Through readings of literary texts in translation, students will be introduced to topics in language, history, literature and art, philosophy and social and political institutions. Dist: LIT; WCult: CI (Xing, Blader)

AMES 43.03 Tokyo and Shanghai as Ideas: Urban Space/Imagined Modernity
Tokyo and Shanghai are not just major centers of political and economic activity. They are also ideas, functioning as imagined space that is backdrop for and symbol of the desires, aspirations, and dislocations characteristic of contemporary Asian societies. This course examines the hold Tokyo and Shanghai have had on East Asian writers, artists, and intellectuals, and the role these metropolises currently play in the globalization of modern culture. Dist: Lit or Int; WCult: NW (Washburn) AMES 85 Independent Research (with Chinese topic)

AMES 86 Advanced Independent Research (with Chinese topic)

AMES 87 Honors Thesis (with Chinese topic)

Other Chinese studies courses accepted for AMES credit:

  • CHIN 11 Special Topics in Chinese Studies (offered on the Beijing FSP) (Faculty)
  • CHIN 22, 23 Intermediate Modern Chinese (Faculty)
  • CHIN 31, 32, 33 Advanced Modern Chinese (Faculty)
  • CHIN 41, 42, 43 Advanced Chinese (Faculty)
  • CHIN 44.1 Chinese Martial Arts Fiction (Xing)
  • CHIN 44.2 Modern Chinese Poetry (Xing)
  • CHIN 51 Introduction to Classical Chinese (Allan)
  • CHIN 52 Readings in Classical Chinese: Daoist Philosophical Texts (Allan)
  • CHIN 53 Readings in Classical Chinese: Confucian Philosophical Texts (Allan)
  • CHIN 53 Classical Chinese Poetry (Xing)
  • CHIN 59 Independent Advanced Study in Chinese Language and Literature (Faculty)
  • CHIN 61 Topics in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture (Gibbs)
  • CHIN 62 Topics in Traditional Chinese Literature and Culture (Faculty)
  • CHIN 63 Themes in Chinese Literature and Culture (Faculty)
  • CHIN 81 Lu Xun and Hu Shi (Mowry)
  • CHIN 82 Chinese Calligraphy and Manuscript Culture: Orchid Pavillion (Xing)
  • CHIN 83 Topics in Chinese Literature and Culture (Faculty)
  • GOVT 50 Topics in International Relations: The Rise of China (Lind)
  • HIST 5.3 The History of China Since 1800 (Crossley)
  • HIST 72 Late Imperial China in a Global Context (Crossley)
  • HIST 73 Early Chinese Culture (identical to Chinese 62) (Faculty)
  • REL 19 Special Topics in Religion-Introductory Level (with Chinese topic) (Raz)
  • REL 41 Readings in Buddhist Literature (with Chinese topic) (Raz)
  • REL 46 Daoism: Transformations of Tradition (Raz)
  • REL 47 Buddhism in China (Raz)
  • REL 48 Body and Sex in Chinese Religions (Raz)
  • REL 49 Topics in East Asian Religions (Raz/Ohnuma)
  • REL 80 and 81 Seminars: (Raz or Ohnuma)

Administrator, Ann Fenton
Last Modified November 8, 2013