Archive by Author

Cherenkov research in ‘Focus’

A scientific breakthrough may give the field of radiation oncology new tools to increase the precision and safety of radiation treatment in cancer patients by helping doctors “see” the powerful beams of a linear accelerator as they enter or exit the body. Twelve patients are participating in a pilot study, which is being conducted by [...]

Continue Reading →

Michaelsen, Schweitzer Fellow

M.D./P.hD. candidate and Optics in Medicine Laboratory member Kelly Michaelsen was selected as a 2013 New Hampshire-Vermont Schweitzer Fellow. Founded in 1996, the Schweitzer fellowship is dedicated to developing healthcare professionals who are committed to addressing unmet health needs. Michaelsen’s Schweitzer project works to connect Dartmouth students and seniors through intergenerational programing at the Bugbee [...]

Continue Reading →

Čerenkov radiation in therapy

In the latest issue of Optics Letters, Dartmouth’s Optics in Medicine Laboratory published an article titled Čerenkov excited fluorescence tomography using external beam radiation. Conducted by graduate students Jennifer-Lynn Demers, Rongxiao Zhang, research scientist Scott Davis, lab director Brian Pogue, and Associate Professor of Medicine David Gladstone, the study examines the use of Čerenkov radiation [...]

Continue Reading →

GAMOS plug-in in OSA publication

The research of Optics in Medicine Laboratory members Adam Glaser, Stephen Kanick, Rongxiao Zhang, and lab director Brian Pogue is featured in the latest volume of Biomedical Optics Express. Published by the Optics Society of America on April 17, 2013, A GAMOS plug-in for GEANT4 based Monte Carlo simulation of radiation-induced light transport in biological media [...]

Continue Reading →

Video on Čerenkov Radiation

In this new video published by the Thayer School of Engineering, Ph.D. candidate Adam Glaser explains his graduate research on the use of Čerenkov fluorescence in medical imaging. Part of a series on the graduate engineering research being conducted at Dartmouth, the video was filmed on location at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. The research photographs taken [...]

Continue Reading →

Glaser on medicalphysicsweb.com

In an article on Cerenkov fluorescence published today by medicalphysicsweb.com, Dartmouth PhD candidate Adam Glaser explains how the light imaging technique can be used to measure an imparted dose from an X-ray photon linac beam. The technique developed by Glaser and his Dartmouth colleagues has been verified through a series of experiments using a clinical [...]

Continue Reading →

Post on Sexton’s Research

The research of Kristian Sexton, a fourth year PhD student in the Optics in Medicine Laboratory, was featured on the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth’s Machine Shop blog. Kristian’s projects are in the field of biomedical technologies, and his research project is part of a larger Dartmouth initiative titled “Fluorescence guided neurosurgery.”  Sexton’s work [...]

Continue Reading →

Fluorescence Imaging at Thayer

A team from Thayer School of Engineering and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center is among the first to harness fluorescence to prevent tissue damage during brain surgery. Over a decade ago, a group of German doctors discovered that if a patient is given an oral dose of a 5-aminolevulinic acid solution before brain surgery, a chemical reaction [...]

Continue Reading →

Thayer Video of Professor Pogue

In a new video published by the Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth Professor of Engineering Brian Pogue explains his research on optical imaging, and highlights the contributions of both undergraduate and graduate students in his laboratory. Filmed on location at the Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, and the Norris Cotton Cancer Center, the [...]

Continue Reading →

Cancer Imaging in ‘The Dartmouth’

Researchers from Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and the Thayer School of Engineering have developed a quantitative imaging system to detect low-grade brain cancer cells and make tumor removal more precise, according to Thayer School professor and research group co-leader Keith Paulsen. The technology consists of a drug, taken pre-operatively, which is broken down, processed and moved [...]

Continue Reading →